ASPECTS OF HARVINGTON'S HISTORY
A personal rendering

Coach & Horses
  Home      pre 1066      Buildings      Census Returns      Church      Dovecote      Families      Histories      Houses      Maps       Notes & Queries       Parish Council      People      Pictures      Public Houses       School       Sports      Transport      War Time      Contact:   

HOUSES

AND THEIR

PEOPLE IN

HARVINGTON


OLD ROADS & PLACES
that relate to properties on this page.
  • Alcester Road
  • Anchor Lane
  • Brickyards
  • Church Bank (Church Street)
  • Church Street
  • Cress Hill (Crest Hill)
  • Finch Lane
  • Grange Lane
  • Green Street
  • Holloway (Ancher Lane)
  • Hughes Lane
  • Leys Road
  • Malthouse Close
  • Main Street (Stratford Road)
  • Rectory Lane (Finch Lane)
  • Shakespeare Lane
  • Skinner's Lane (Finch Lane)
  • Station Bank (Ancher Lane)
  • Station Road
  • Stratford Road
  • Vicarage Lane (Finch Lane)
  • Village Street
  • Walker's Lane (Finch Lane)
DEEDS
that have been transcribed.
CONTENTS
  • Candle Cottage: Church Street.
  • Cedar Lodge: Village Street.
  • Chandler Cottage: Church Street.
  • Church Cottage: Church Street.
  • Church House: Church Street.
  • Cider press cottage: Stratford Road.
  • Cleeve View: Cress Hill.
  • Cluna: Grange Lane.
  • Coles Cottages (old): Village Street.
  • Coles Cottages (new): Village Street.
  • CRUCK FRAMED BUILDINGS
    dated to before 1600 plus other pre 1600 structures.
    • Crooked Walls - 3 crucks
    • Dovecote
    • Dream Cottage - 1 cruck
    • Manor Farm - 1 cruck
    • Padmore Cottage - 1 cruck
    • Cider Press Cottage - 1 cruck
    • St James the Great
    • Ye Olde Cottage - 2 crucks
    UNIDENTIFIED PROPERTIES
    as recorded in the 1939 and 1949 lists of residents.
    • Stoneleigh
    • The Rosary



    HOUSES

    Introduction

    The Dean and Chapter of Worcester Cathedral is the Lord of the Manor of Harvington. "Harvington was formerly part and parcel of the Copyhold Manor of Harvington in the County of Worcester, and was held for lives by Copy of Court Roll under the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Worcester."

    It is assumed that at one time the Dean and Chapter of Worcester Cathedral owned the freehold of all the houses and land in the parish of Harvington. The land and houses were held within a, to the layman, complicated arrangement of leasehold and copyhold. Over the last 200 years the Church has been selling off the freehold, thereby releasing its control of the village. This process is still ongoing such as at Green Street Farm, where the freehold has only just (2014) been sold, in this case to the Byrd family. The Dean and Chapter however still retain freehold of the surrounding land stretching from the Alcester Road down to the Salford Road.

    It is not easy to tell when a particular house's freehold was released from the Church. The freehold of The Laurels and The Limes for instance appear to have been sold in 1920. The point being made here is that some of the families that one would assume to be living in a freehold property may in fact have held either a leases, or a copyhold or had a simple rental agreement.

    Please see Buildings for properties in Harvington that are not associated with living accomodation.

    28 & 29 Grange Lane: Two semi-detached red brick cottages. 1838 map reference: 209


    Grange Cottages, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The cottages have been numbered 28 & 29 Grange Lane for a long time.

    In 1949 Kenneth and Ivy Walden lived at '28 Grange Cottages'. They were not in the village in 1939.

    47 Village Street: A small semi-detached brick cottage adjacent to the old Hop Pole Inn. It appears to have been built prior to 1838, possibly as a barn. 1838 map reference: 90


    47 Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Shailer family lived here in the 1920's.

    Apple Tree Cottage: A semi-detached timber framed cottage. 1838 map reference: 176


    Apple Tree Cottage, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    At some stage before 1916 Apple Tree Cottage and the adjoining James Cottage were rendered and possibly at this stage acquired the names Ladbrook and Padmore.

    Bert and Bessie Shailer bought Padmore Cottage (later Apple Tree) and adjoining Ladbrook House (later James) circa 1916 for £250 and lived there with their two children Lilian and Connie. The property included the ground to the rear of the properties, now the gardens of the two Hop Kiln properties. The Shailer's, like the Rawlings after them, lived in Ladbrook and rented out the smaller Padmore. At a later stage a dormer window was inserted above the front door as early photographs do not show the dormer.

    In 1939 'Church Bank' was occupied by Ernest and Constance Rawlings and Esmerelda Shailer.

    In 1949 'Padmore Cottage, Church Road' was occupied by Esmerelda Shailer.

    By the 1940's Bert Shailer's daughter Connie and her husband Ernest Rawlings, were living at Ladbrook while Bert's widow Bessie lived in Padmore. In the 1950's one of the tenants was a couple called David and Barbara Ward. Another was a Mr Hickman and another was a couple who left in the night along with all the furniture! After the death of her husband, In 1976 Connie's sister Lilian and her husband Jack moved into Padmore. Afterwards both properties were sold seperately.

    In 2016 the property was sold by Heather Dallow to the Ashplant family, owners of the adjacent James Cottage.

    Avon Bank: A semi-detached brick cottage built at the turn of the nineteenth century on Cress Hill. 1838 map reference: 107


    Avon Bank, Cress Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 'Avon Bank' was occupied by Jesse and Emily Shervington.

    Leonard & Dora Shervington lived in this house for many years. Their daughter Iris, married John Middleton and they had a son called Rob. They now (2015) live in Norton and are in their 80's. They own part of Cress Hill, the second plot from the bottom.

    Avon View: A detached brick cottage built at the turn of the nineteenth century on Cress Hill. 1838 map reference: 108a


    Avon View, Cress Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 when 'Avon View' was occupied by Edwin and Mabel Robbins. They are mentioned in 1839 but their home is not mentioned.

    The cottage belonged to Ted Robbins and his wife from the probably before 1939. They then built the Conifers on Cress Hill around about 1960 and after Ted had died his wife built and lived in the house in Station Road where the present (2014) John Redman lives. Others lived in the house until Phil and Rene Dunn moved in, Rene now lives there on her own.

    Avon Villa: Name changed to Bank House. 1838 map reference: 197/8
    Bank Cottage: A timber framed cottage, side on to the road and attached to The Malthouse. 1838 map reference: 199


    Bank Cottage, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Bank Cottage is thought to be part of a larger house centred on the adjoining Malt House, built circa 1650. It has clearly had a chequered history with much alteration. It contains a cellar accessed from the front. In the back wall of the cellar is a blocked up doorway which led via steps to the back of the kitchen of the Malt House above. It is probable that it was once two dwellings. Adjacent to the cellar's outside entrance is another blocked up entrance to the cottage. Access was later transferred to the side where there are two entrances, one to the living room and one to the kitchen. One used to ascend steps from the street to the side of the property but this was blocked up about thirty years (1985) ago. One now enters the property further down the street. The living room boasts a much altered inglenook.

    In the 1860's it was part of the Bank House Estate and continued so until 30th July 1948 when it was sold by the Tomkins who had inherited Bank House and was known then as Bank Cottage.

    Taylor
    The property was the home of Albert Charles Taylor and his wife Annie. For a number of years Charles was the gardener for Walter and Amelia Malin at Bank House. Mr Malin, who died in 1948, had promised that after his death they would have Bank Cottage. They had therefore paid for electricity to be installed. They also had an allotment on the site of Ragley Road. Muriel Taylor, his niece, and her bridegroom Walter Allvey had their honeymoon night in the cottage. Shortly after Mr Malin's death, expecting to receive the property deeds they received a letter ordering them to vacate the property. They moved to a tied cottage in Kemerton.

    Thornton
    Stanley Henry Thornton, born Surbiton, Surrey 22 Jan 1887. He was married in the Bromley area in 1914 to Elizabeth Daisy Baxter, born Marylebone 8 Mar 1891. Living at "Three Gates", Knowle, near Birmingham, Hospital Superintendant when purchasing Bank Cottage, Harvington on 30th July 1948 (See the Bank House Deeds). He died Evesham area 6 Oct 1970, she died Evesham area 17 Feb 1972.

    In the 1949 Electoral Roll it was occupied by the Thorntons'. The Thornton family lived here in the 1950/60's.

    Griffiths
    Late in 1975 a young couple called Sue & Berni Griffiths bought the cottage. Berni was a teacher at Pershore High School. People used to think that they had three children: Tom, Dick & Harry, but in actual fact their first born was Tom Dickon Harry. Somehow the name got known to the 'News of the World' whose reporter visited them to write a piece about Tom, Dick and Harry. They subsequently had a second child called Harry.

    At that time the bedroom in the front and adjacent to Malt House was owned and part of Malt House. The Griffiths' wanted to buy it but Mrs Moss refused to sell.

    Sue & Berni eventually sold up and moved to Tuscany in Italy where they stayed for a while before retuning to the north of England. It was only after Mrs Moss's death in 1985 that the room became part of Bank Cottage.

    Two soliciators from the north of England owned the cottage and mostly let it out via Rural Rentals. They sold it to Kathleen Luton in 2006. Kathleen lived in the cottage until selling it in late 2016.

    Bank House: A large Victorian house built in the 1880's, eventually replacing two, probably timber-framed, cottages. 1838 map reference: 197/8
    History of the property so far gathered.

    It is clear from the Deeds that present Bank House is the successor to two cottages that were the main part of a much larger holding which included much land and a number of cottages. The first recorded owner was John Marshall, a member of the Marshalls of Manor Farm. The 1838 tithe map shews two cottages on the land with the upper (plot 197) cottage plus a small outbuilding and the lower (plot 198) cottage with a detached barn.


    The two cottages: 197 & 198, the large property on the right is the Laurels.

    1. The upper cottage continued as an annex to the present house and was demolished sometime after the revised 1928 OS map and before 1954. The Deeds and OS maps suggest that Avon Villa (Bank House) was built between 1884 and 1888.
    2. The lower cottage was auctioned at the Coach and Horses on 8th Aug 1994. It was occupied at the time by Elizabeth Charles until her death in 1900, her successor was Rosa Malin who lived here until she inherited Avon Villa in 1901, the cottage is thought to have been demolished by Rosa sometime after. The 1838 map suggests that the lower cottage with its detached barn was the more substantial.

    There is no record of what the two cottages looked like or how old they were. Like all the older dwellings in the village they were probably timber framed and thatched and their appearance on the 1838 map suggests they were similar in size to Finch Hay and Rose Cottage in Finch Lane.

    The first documents in the Deeds date from 1870, they do however refer to a number of previous documents dating from the 1860's. The first mentioned Indenture is dated 8th October 1863 and is a contract between the Ecclesiastical Commissioners of the 1st part, John Marshall of the 2nd part and the Rev Samuel Charles of the 3rd part. There is only a hint here but are we detecting a transfer of the freehold from the church to John Marshall as the first freehold owner? John Marshall died on 4th June 1864 and was buried in the churchyard. The next deed, dated 28th October 1863 is significant as the Rev Samuel Charles, is receiving £1882 from Samuel Jackson, a farmer, along with a consideration to John Marshall. Rev Charles appears to be acting on John Marshall's behalf. Back in 1809 John Marshall's sister Mary had married Samuel Stone Charles. Samuel Stone Charles was a Maltster and it appears logical to assume that the block of eight properties known as Malthouse cottages relate to his activities.

    Charles Family
    Samuel Stone Charles, born Hinchwicke in Gloucestershire 14th April 1783 and Styled 'of Stow-on-the-Wold' when he married Mary Marshall, daughter of John Marshall (senior), at Harvington. John Marshall was a witness to their marriage on 23rd Feb 1809. The 1841 Census records that John Marshall (junior), farmer, aged 50, was head occupier with Mary Charles, aged 50, and M M Charles, aged 25, Samuel Stone Charles is not listed. They were probably living in the lower cottage. In the 1851 Census Samuel Stone Charles, Maltster, was living with Mary Charles his wife, aged 67 and Elizabeth Charles, his daughter, aged 30. Interesting to note is that the next entry was of William Hawkes Marshall (another relative), a Farmer of 200 acres, aged 59, who was later buried in the churchyard. Where was William Hawkes Marshall living? John Marshall is also listed as head, aged 65, a Farmer of 165 acres, living with Mary Marshall Charles, niece aged 36, housekeeper. Samuel Stone Charles died in Harvington 4th February 1859. In the 1861 Census John Marshall and Mary Charles, wife of Samuel Stone Charles, are living in the same house. Mary died 13th March 1872 aged 83. See the Marshall Family under Families and Churchyard for more detail. They had issue:-
    1. Samuel, living in Harvington in 1874, trained Trinity College, Cambridge, BA 1842, MA 1845 (Clergy List 1874). He sold property on 23rd October 1863 to Samuel Jackson, Farmer for £1882 subject to the life interest of John Marshall who died the following year. Rev Charles carried out a number of transactions involving the Bank House estate.
    2. Elizabeth, born Donnington, Gloucestershire 16th May 1820. In 1895 she was living in the lower cottage as tenant with under-tenants, she died in Harvington on 5th June 1900 and was buried in the churchyard.
    3. Emily Sarah, died 7th October 1829, aged 7.

    The next mentioned and more complicated indenture is dated 29th October 1863 between the same Samuel Charles (1st pt) and again Samuel Jackson (2nd pt), Samuel Garrard (3rd pt), Herbert New & John James Tipper (4th pt), Benjamin Bomford & Hemming James Bomford (5th pt), Samuel Jackson (6th pt), Courtenay Connell Prance (7th pt). Rev Charles granted the hereditaments comprised in a Schedule of properties and lands, transcribed below to the use of Courtenay Connell Prance, subject nevertheless upon the then living John Marshall. It appears that Rev Charles is raising money from the gentlemen above, either by mortgage or selling parts of the Bank House estate.

    Another indenture dated 4th May 1865 is between the same Samuel Charles, Joseph Smith and Courtenay Connell Prance for £600. In 1867 Samuel Jackson makes a Will bequeathing all his property to his sons Henry Shailer Jackson, Alfred Herbert Jackson and to his son-in-law William Tunnicliffe Cowley and then dies on 6th February 1868.

    The 1870 documents including a schedule of possessions which gives us a fine picture of the extensive amount of property attached to the Bank House estate. It encompassed not only the area surrounding the two cottages but also the block known as Malt House cottages, the two timber-framed cottages in Finch Lane, various plots, orchards &c., plus a very large tract of land mostly bordering the upper reaches of Harvington Brook.

    On 13th September 1870 an indenture is drawn up between Henry Shailer Jackson of Arrow, Alfred Herbert Jackson of Bevington, William Tunnicliffe Cowley of Haselor, of the 1st part, with Rev Samuel Garrard of Park Hall of the 2nd part, Herbert New, John James Tipper, Parchment Manufacturer both of Evesham of the 3rd part, Benjamin Bomford of Pichell, Farmer and Hemming James Bomford of Dunnington, Farmer of the 4th part, Joseph Smith of Bromsgrove, Miller and Courtenay Connell Prance of Evesham of the 5th part John Hiatt of Quinton of Gloucester of the 6th part, Bernard Baldwyn of Aston Mill Farm, Kemerton of the 7th part, Henry Shailer Jackson of the 8th part, Courtenay Connell Prance of the 9th part. What must be involved here is that the estate is being split up and sold with the Finch Lane cottages along with some land being retained.

    On 1st December 1870 a conveyance between Courtenay Connell Prance and Anthony Martin of Evesham, Surgeon, lists Henry Shailer Jackson, Alfred Herbert Jackson, William Tunnicliffe Cowley, Samuel Garrard (Solicitor), Herbert New and John James Tipper, Benjamin Bomford Hemming James Bomford, Joseph Smith, John Hiatt and Bernard Baldwyn as being asked by Courtenay Connell Prance to release their involvement in the second part of the Schedule now in occupation of:-
    Mrs (Mary) Charles
    Miss (Elizabeth) Charles
    William Spark
    Job Stanley
    William Best (In Malthouse cottages - see under Families)
    Charles Aldington

    Charles Aldington, is listed in the 1871 Census as born Elmley Castle, aged 37 and a Carpenter. In 1881 he was a wheelwright living in Harvington with his daughter Mary Ann, aged 8.
    Job Stanley, is listed in 1881 as born Rous Lench, aged 47 and an Ag Lab living at the Brickyard with wife Hannah and family.

    This second part of the conveyance refers to the lower cottage, some land and the Malthouse cottages. It indicates that Mrs Mary Charles and her daughter Elizabeth had now become tenants. The Malthouse cottages are not mentioned in the Deeds again until 1917 when Rosa Malin purchased them from Joseph Cull. It is not known how Joseph Cull acquired the properties.

    The following Jackson and Prance families, and also William Collins, although involved in the Bank House estate, never lived in Harvington. Note the Prance connection with the Garrard family, both were solicitorial families and involved in mortgages and property deals.

    Jackson Family
    Samuel Jackson, born Bevington c1794. Farmer of 275 acres in 1851. He married Ann, born Salford c1796.
    1. Rosa Matilda, born Bevington, aged 14 in 1851. She was married in Alcester in 1857 to William Tunnicliff Cowley, Farmer of Haselow.
    2. Charles, born Bevington, aged 21 in 1851.
    3. Henry Shailer, bap Weethley 2 Oct 1825, Farmer at Arrow. Married in Alcester 20th Feb 1851 to Anne Taylor. They had issue:-
    4. Alfred Herbert, born Bevington, aged 9 in 1851.
    5. Fannie Ada Annie, bap Binton 21st Feb 1853.

    Prance Family
    Courtenay Connell Prance, born Plymouth c1822. He married Matilda Garrard at Alcester in 1885, born Dumbleton c1835. In 1871 he was described as an Attorney, Solicitor and landowner, living in Prospect House, Bengeworth. They had issue:-
    1. Bernard G, born Bengeworth, aged 9 in 1871.
    2. Hugh Courtenay, born Bengeworth, aged 7 in 1871.
    3. Geoffrey Hammett, born Bengeworth, aged 4 in 1871. Became an MD and died in 1944.

    In 1870 the Jackson's sold the upper cottage and garden to George Osborne, of Market Square, St. Neots, Huntingdonshire. It is fortuitous that the Deed lists the number 197 as this appears on the 1838 map as the area immediately around the present property. The occupants at the time are listed as John Burton and Samuel Jackson.

    Osborne Family
    George Osborne was born in Wednesbury, Staffordshire c1812. He was living in St Neots, Huntingdonshire in 1861 and was still there when purchasing the (upper) cottage in 1870. In 1881 he was living in Harvington as a retired Tailor and Woollen Draper with his wife Frances, born Steeple Gidding, Huntingdonshire c1811, and their daughter Agnes Blanche Osborne, born Kidderminster c1836. Living with them as a boarder was William Guest, a retired Cotton and Cloth Merchant, born Birmingham and aged 77, along with a servant Caroline Roberts from Salford Priors aged 15. Frances, died 23rd May 1887, aged 77. In 1888 George sold Avon Villa and died 12th October 1889, aged 78. They were buried in the churchyard, see their tombstone under Churchyard. They had issue:-

    1. Agnes Blanche, born Kidderminster c1836. She never married and died in Evesham 1891 aged 55 and buried in Harvington.
    2. George D, born Hertford c1841.
    3. John Henson, born Steeple Gidding, Huntingdonshire in 1854. Living at 21 Berwick Street, Westminster in 1882 as a Hosier and Draper. He was married in London on 21st April 1878 to Kathleen Jeacocke and was a Transport Board employee when dying in Auckland, New Zealand. Buried Hillsborough Cemetery 28th April 1925, aged 77. They had issue:-
      1. William Henson Leonard, bap Christchurch, Newgate Street, London 10th Dec 1882.
    4. Emma, born c1856.

    On 29th Sept 1888 there was a conveyance between George Osborne of Harvington and William Collins of Evesham, Hay and Straw dealer, of Avon Villa of the property formerly consisting of two cottages, note the word formerly, the name Avon Villa appears in a Deed dated to 1888. The most likely candidate to have built the present house is George Osborne who owned the property between 1870 and 1888. The 1838 tithe map shews to plots of land numbered as 197 and 198. Both have dwellings on them. The dwelling on 197 is exactly where the present house stands while the other dwelling along with a barn, is nearer the road and numbered 198. One of the documents gives a hint that the property 197 was attached to the present building and this is backed up by the OS maps and demolished sometime after 1926.

    Collins Family
    William Collins, born Bricklehampton, aged 49 in 1891, Hay & Straw dealer living Greenhill, Evesham, with his wife Rhoda, born Evesham aged 50 and children. They had issue:-
    1. John, born Evesham, a timber measurer aged 23 in 1891.
    2. George, born Evesham, a gardener aged 21 in 1891.
    3. Joseph, born Evesham, a carpenter's apprentice aged 20 in 1891.
    4. Ernest, born Evesham, aged 12 in 1891.

    On 12th July 1893: William Collins conveyed to Harvey Hunt, a messuage called Avon Villa formerly occupied by George Osborne and now for some time by Harvey Hunt, an Auctioneer and Valuer, born Evesham, aged 45 in 1891, living in the house with his wife Catherine, born Birmingham, aged 43, along with a servant named Kate Pitt, born Cleeve Priors, aged 17. William Collins had rented the property to Harvey Hunt who was living in the village in 1991 and when purchasing the property the deeds state that he had lived in the house for some time as a tenant.

    In 1870 Harvey Hunt married into the Malin Family who were living in the village from at least 1871. It is not known at present where they were living but they had three servants and the 1871 Census hints at either Langton House or Dalkeith in Village Street.

    3rd October 1895: A conveyance relating to the lower Cottage (198) between Edward Herbert Drayton, formerly of Kensington but now of Southend, Barrister, and Harvey Hunt, Auctioneer of Evesham of a cottage and garden. Anthony Martin, Surgeon, deceased, bequeathed to his friend Herbert New, Solicitor of Evesham, his wife's nephew Edward Herbert Draper. Anthony Martin died on 10th April 1878. Herbert New, died on 28th Nov 1893. The property was auctioned at the Coach and Horses on 8th Aug 1994 and bought by Harvey Hunt. The house was occupied by Miss Elizabeth Charles and her under-tenants. To the north is land occupied by Thomas Cull and to the west by Harvey Hunt and Thomas Cull.

    The above mentioned conveyance of 3rd October 1895 is interesting in that it confirms that the late Herbert New was the owner of the lower cottage and that it was the unnamed purchase by Herbert New in the conveyance and indenture of 1870.

    Hunt Family
    Harvey Hunt, born Evesham area 1846, He married in Harvington in 1870 Catherine Mary Malin, born Birmingham 1847 and was an Auctioneer and Valuer. By 1881 they were living in the village, probably as tenants and finally bought Avon Villa on 12th July 1893 and the lower cottage on 8th Aug 1994. He died in Evesham 2nd March 1901, aged 55 and Catherine died 11th May 1899, aged 51. Harvey left his estate to Rosa Malin. They were both buried in the churchyard, see under Churchyard and Families.

    25th May 1917: a conveyance between Mr Joseph Cull, of 99 Port Street, Bengeworth, retired Inspector of Police, to Rosa Malin of Harvington of eight messuages and an orchard. The cottages were formerly a messuage and malthouse in occupation of:-

    1. Oliver Harris (Malt House & No.1)
    2. G M Robinson
    3. William Bishop (No.2)
    4. Walter Bishop
    5. Clara Beck
    6. Beatrice Miles
    7. Charles Newman (see Crooked Walls)
    as tenants thereof with one cottage unoccupied. Up to this time Rosa Malin rented the neighbouring orchard.

    Cull Family Thomas Cull, born Cheltenham circa 1824. He married Emma Adkins in Alcester in 1848, she was born in Alderminster. In 1861 he was an innkeeper in Port Street, Evesham with his mother Hannah living with them. Thomas owned land near to Bank House in 1895. He died in 1915 aged 91. They had issue:-

    1. Joseph Cull, born Evesham 1848. He married Sarah Simms at Alderbury in 1869. In 1881 they were living in Tiddington. In 1891 living in Stratford upon Avon where he was a police sergeant. Either Joseph Cull or his father Thomas had acquired Malthouse cottages sometime prior to 1895 when Thomas Cull is mentioned as a neighbour to the lower cottage. In 1901 he was an Inspector of Police living in Alcester and by 1911 it is assumed they were living in one of the Malthouse cottages. In 1917 Joseph was living at 99 Port Street, Bengeworth when he sold the eight properties to Rosa Malin. Joseph died 1928 aged 81. They had issue:-

      1. Lucy Ann, born Ilkley, Yorkshire 1869, aged 11 in 1881.
      2. Florence, born Ashton, Glos 1873, aged 7 in 1881.
      3. Edith Beal, born Stratford 1880. She married at Alcester in 1904.
    2. Harry, aged 1 in 1851.

    1921 The Bank, formerly known as Avon Villa, was in the possession of Harvey Hunt before Rosa Malin. The old cottage (upper) was attached to the east side of Bank House. The conveyance also mentions that a cottage (lower) had been demolished for some time formerly in the occupation of Miss Charles and subsequently of Rosa Malin.

    4th June 1921: Conveyance relating to the triangular piece of land situate behind Bank House which includes the footpath. It was transferring ownership from William Henry Stratton to Rosa and Amelia Maud Malin. The attached plan appears to indicate the the footpath, track or even lane once abutted the rear of the house and took a right-angle to join the present path.

    A newspaper cutting dated circa 1954 speaks of the White Family who lived in Shakespeare Cottages and mentions that Jack White had been the gardener to Harvey Hunt and later to Rosa Malin for many years.

    In 1939 'The Bank' was occupied by Walter and Amelia Malin.

    !946, document stated that the land beyond the footpath formerly belonged to William Henry Stratton (of the Limes). Rosa Malin had formerly possessed the triangular piece of land at the rear of Bank House and that an Assent stated that Walter Malin owned seven of the eight cottages.

    Walter Malin, Company Director, late of The Bank, died on 8th April 1948 and left the property to William Alfred Tomkins, Company Director and Nancy Tomkins, Spinster both of Broad View, Benge Hill, Evesham where they were living in 1944 when Walter Malin mentioned them in his Will. They sold The Bank to the Mellor's who were at the time living in the property. They also sold Bank Cottage.

    The Malin Family
    See under families for a history and pedigree of the Malin Family.
    George Malin, 1826-1893 married Catherine Hawkes Marshall and lived in a large house in Village Street, possibly at Dalkeith. Through Catherine the family was connected to John Marshall of the Bank House estate. They had issue:-

    1. Catherine, born in Harvington 1847. She married Harvey Hunt in 1870 who in 1893/4 bought the two cottages.
    2. Mary Keyte, Mary Keyte, born Harvington 1849.
    3. George, born Harvington, 1851/2.
    4. Jane, born Harvington 1853.
    5. Maria, born Harvington 1854. She married John Bullock of Manor Farm in Harvington and died 28th June 1940.
    6. Rosa, born Harvington 1857. She moved into the lower cottage upon the death of Elizabeth Charles in 1900. She was the sole beneficiary of her brother-in-law Harvey Hunt who died in 1901 and she became the owner of the two cottages plus Avon Villa. She then moved into Avon Villa (The Bank) at some stage after 1901. In 1917 she bought the eight Malthouse cottages off Joseph Cull plus an orchard and in 1921 the triangular piece of land directly behind Bank House. She died 21st June 1925, leaving everything to her sister Amelia Maud Malin.
    7. William Marshall, born Harvington 1858.
    8. Herbert, bor Harvington 1860.
    9. Amelia Maud Malin, born Harvington 1864. She inherited Bank House off her sister Rosa Malin. She appointed her brother Walter as executor and her sister Maria as Executrix and left everything to them in equel share. She died on 8th July 1940, probate granted 18th October 1940.
    10. Walter, born Harvington 1865. He lived at Bank House until dying in 1948, aged 83. Towards the end his gardener Charlie Taylor, who lived in Bank Cottage, took care of him and was promised the cottage but when Walter died his (probate granted 18th June 1948) estate passed to William Tomkins, Nancy Tomkins and Leonard Charles Cox, Solicitor, as joint beneficiaries.victed

    The Malin's had lived at the Bank since 1893 and with the death of Walter Malin in 1948 their interest in the property ceased.

    The Tomkins Family
    William Alfred, born Aston 1887. Married Laura Edith Smith at Aston in 1910 and were living in Evesham in 1939. Upon inheriting the property in 1948 they sold it to the Mellors.

    The selling of Bank Cottage is not mentioned in the Deeds. It is however known that the Tomkins evicted Charlie Taylor and his family from Bank Cottage and sold it seperately in 1948.

    The three Mellor sisters were already living at Bank House as tenants when they purchased it on 1st November 1948. A portion of it however appears to have been held in trust by the Tomkins, see the conveyance of 1954.

    The Mellor Family
    George D Mellor, born Cheshire. He was married in Northwich, Cheshire 1875 to Sarah A Hall, born Crew, aged 39 in 1891. In 1891 he and his family were farming at Merebrook Farm, Hanley Castle near Upton on Severn, aged 44. They had issue:-

    1. Annie, born Bollington, Cheshire c 1878.
    2. George D, born Bollington, Cheshire c 1880.
    3. Laura Elizabeth, born Alderley, Cheshire c1881.
    4. Mary Florence, born Alderley, Cheshire c 1883. Living in 1948 at The Bank, Harvington.
    5. Samuel Hall, born Alderley, Cheshire 1886. Served in WW1 as a corporal for 2 yrs 4 mths in Berkshire Regt. In 1911 he was living as a boarder in Hornsey, Middlesex, still living in 1958.
    6. Eleanor Gertrude, born Upton-on-Severn 1887. Living in 1948 at The Bank, Harvington. Died St Albans, 1957, aged 69. Her Admin states that she was living at Crinnis, Woodland Avenue, Teignmouth, Devon spinster, died 19th July 1958 at the Hill End Hospital, St Albans. was to Constance Mellor and Samuel Hall Mellor, retired local government officer.
    7. Constance Lavinia, living in 1948 at the Church of South India, Medak, Mizanis, Dominious, South India. By 1954 she had returned to England and was living at Bank House with her sisters. Died Teignemouth, 1958, aged 63. Her admin states that she was living at Crinnis, Woodland Avenue, Teignmouth, Devon spinster, died 8th December 1958 at the City Hospital, Exeter. Probate was to Samuel Hall Mellor, retired local government officer.
    In 1930-1937 Constance Lavinia Mellor, Elizabeth Geer Mellor, Mary Florence Mellor, Samuel Hall Mellor were living at 29 Woodcroft Avenue, Barnet, Middlesex.

    18th March 1948, an assent and two memorandums:-

    1. 25th March 1946: A memorandum concerning six (excluding most of Bank Cottage) Malt House Cottages between Walter Malin and Cyril Dennis Moss, Stockman, one of the cottages being a shop in the occupsation of Mrs Moss. The remaining cottages in ccupation of respectively:-
      1. William Bishop (No.2)
      2. Mrs Ludlow (No.3)
      3. Walter Bishop (No.5)
      4. Miss Massey and Mrs Massey (No.6)

    2. 30th July 1948: Another memorandum referring to a conveyance made between William Alfred Tomkins, Nancy Edith Tomkins and Leonard Charles Cox and Stanley Henry Thornton of "Three Gates", Knowle, near Birmingham, Hospital Superintendant of the property known as Bank Cottage

    Bank Cottage
    The above memorandum explains that on 30th July 1948 the Tomkins sold Bank Cottage to Stanley Henry Thornton.

    Malthouse cottages
    This is a block of timber framed, brick and stone cottages. The cottages noted in the Bank House Deeds as Malthouse cottages and the present Malthouse cottages in Malthouse Close need some attempt at explanation.

    The present setup is: Bank Cottage (Stratford Road), Malt House (Stratford Road), and numbers 1 to 9 (Malthouse Close).

    The Deeds record eight then seven (formerly eight), then six cottages and sometimes a list of tenants. Bank Cottage was possibly two cottages at one time. Some tenants can be connected to individual cottages and it is also difficult to reconcile the Deed's seven to eight cottages with the present setup. Please refer to Malt House, Malthouse Cottages and The Old Store.

    26th March 1946 - a memorandum between Walter Malin (Vendor) and Cyril Dennis Moss, Stockman, (Purchaser) of six cottages one of which is the shop, Bank Cottage is not included in this transaction.

    Finch Hay
    The Deeds of the cottage called Finch Hay, set behind Bank House, indicate that it was part of the Bank House estate in 1870. The Walker family had been tenants of Finch Hay from at least 1939 and were taking out a mortgage on it in 1956. Its earliest deeds are two assents dating from 1946, there is no actual Conveyance so it is not clear when they purchased it.

    In 1949 'The Bank' was occupied by Mary, Isobel, Eleanor, Constance Mellor and Annie Pennie.

    12th January 1954, the three Mellor sisters who were living at The Bank, sold the property to John Sanders Haines of Thornchase, Abbotswood, Greenhill, Evesham, market gardener. John Haines is still registered at The Bank in 1967.

    15th Feb 1968 the property is now known as Bank House in a conveyance between John Sanders Haines and Mr Michael John & Mrs Kathleen Norah Gibbins.

    Haines Family
    Michael Haines and Kathleen Gwatkin married in Uckfield, Sussex 1959. Prior to Bank House the Gibbons lived at 'Borralls', Weavers Hill, Hunt End, Redditch. They had issue:-

    1. Susan N, born Bromsgrove 1960.
    2. Helen C, born Bromsgrove 1962.
    3. Rachel M, born Bromsgrove 1965

    1968, a conveyance of this date refers to the property once being called Avon Villa and that a long since demolished cottage was once adjoined on the eastern side.

    9th June 1978, a conveyance between Michael John & Kathleen Norah Gibbins and Anthony Randle and Rosemary Margaret Darwall-Smith with the Portsmouth Building Society & a receipt dated 7th April 1981.

    Darwall-Smith Family
    Anthony Randle Darwall-Smith, married Rosemary Margaret Howden in Warwick 1966. The Darwall-Smith's had lived at 'Dormar' 15 Fairfield Lane, Farnham Royal Bucks when they bought Bank House. They had issue:-
    1. Timophy Howden, born 1968.
    2. Nicholas Anthony, born 1970.

    7th April 1981, a conveyance transfers ownership from Anthony Randle and Rosemary Margaret Darwell-Smith to Douglas Gordon Nicholls, Pricing Manager, European Division, Finance, and Ruth Alwyn Nicholls.

    21st Sept 1988, Douglas and Ruth Nicholls of Bank House sold the north-eastern portion (once containing the old lower cottage - see plan) of the garden to Philip Edward Thomas, of 32 The Willows and John Mansell Thomas, of 41 Bordon Place, both of Stratford upon Avon, then trading under the name of E Thomas & Sons. They either built or sold the plots for the two large houses, Holm Oak and Northgate House.

    It is believed that Bank House was unoccupied between 1988 and 1992.

    9th November 1992, Bank House was sold with the present dimensions, to Chris and Cathy Haynes then living at 4 Collinsfield, Greenhill, Evesham. It is noted that Bank House was addressed as in Church Street.

    The property was registered in 1994 with the documents listed back to 1948.

    Looking at the house from an architectural and historical view point it is clear that the house has gone through many major alterations and additions, a story to be told another day.


    PROPERTY DEEDS
    The Property
    Deeds these are the deeds to Bank House up until the time when the property was registered. The Deed were made available for this site by the present (2018) owners Chris and Cathy Haines. The material ranges from 1862 to 1985.

    Bess Cottage: Name changed to Candle Cottage. 1838 map reference: 174
    Beverley: A house built in the 1950's. 1838 map reference: 99

    Beverley, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This was the home of the Mr and Mrs Hughes.

    Birch House: A large brick house built circa 1953. 1838 map reference: 215


    Birch House, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This property was built by Ken Wheeler in 1953 for his eldest son and was originally called the 'Starlings'. The house replaced a number of buildings in this area. Grange Cottages were demolished to make way to Birch House. There was also a large timber framed house or barn that behind what is now Birch House. Nothing at present is known about this building. It is said by locals that it was a house but the 1839 map suggests that it was a barn.

    Blacksmith's Cottage: A timber-framed cottage next to the Cider Press Cottage that once stood in Stratford Road. Its real name, if any, is not known but it was the home of the village blacksmith. It was demolished in the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 179


    Blacksmith's Cottage on the right with George Grimmitt shoeing a horse in the adjacent smithy.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This old house was the the home of the village blacksmith. The name Blacksmith's Cottage has been added by the editor to help identify the property. Alongside and to the right was the smithy. Both buildings were demolished in the 1930's to widen the road and make way for the Hop Kiln Council Houses. A new smithy was erected and 2 Hop Kiln Cottages was the home of the last village blacksmith George Grimmitt.

    See under Buildings for more information.

    Blakenhurst: An estate built off the Leys Road from 1961 onwards. Numbers 1 to 7 at the T-junction between Blakenhurst and Brookdale were the first to be built.
    1838 map reference: 13

    There is every likelyhood that a Romano-British settlement lies under the higher part of Blakenhust. The settlement, possibly a small fort, is known to extend westwards into the community orchard. The rear gardens of numbers one to seven originally extended back to the boundary ditch on the north side of Blakenhurst.

    Number one: The first occupant is not known, but maybe still (2016) living there.

    Number three: The first occupants were the Stamp family.

    Number five: The first occupant was John Marshall.

    Number seven: The first occupant was newly married John Shailer who now lives on Cress Hill.

    Bramblings: A bungalow built circa 1969. 1838 map reference: 215


    Bramblings, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This house was built on the site of an old barn and the present drive was the approach lane to this barn Bramblings was built by Ken Wheeler for Miss Lilian Morrow, housekeeper and niece to Mr Bomford at the Grange. Miss Morrow, who was born in Ireland, called the bungalow 'Cluna'. She is depicted in a WI group photograph in Notes and Queries, she died in 1987.

    Phil and Doreen Bawn purchased the property and changed its name to Bramblings. They have modernised the house considerably and still (2017) live there.

    Bredon Grounds: Victorian terrace of three brick dwellings. 1838 map reference: 77


    Bredon Grounds, Hughes Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 the 'Bredon Grounds' row was occupied by George and Mary Beazley, Edwin Birkenshaw (No.2) and Hubert and Elizabeth Gardner.

    In 1949 'Bredon Grounds' were occupied by the Beasleys' (1 & 3) and Hubert & Julia Gradner (2).

    Bredon View: Victorian brick house with circa 1900. 1838 map reference: 89


    Bredon View, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'The Stores' was occupied by Arthur Ashmead.

    In 1949 'Harvington Stores' was occupied by Amy and Ethel Spencer. There is still a faint painted shop sign high up on the west side of the property.

    Brickyard Cottages: A hamlet situated within the parish of Harvington on the Alcester Road and adjacent to the northern boundary of the parish. 1838 map reference: 1

    The Brickyard, now called 'Brickyard Cottages' hamlet, originally only had one thatched cottage, adjacent to the parish boundary, replaced by the present Boundary House. The remaining houses were all built in Victorian times by the Bomfords at Harvington Lodge to house their employees. The Brickyard Cottages were still owned by the Bomford's until the early 1960's, when the Estate was divided and the properties remained with the Bomford's or the Hughes', depending on which side of the road they were, and only afterwards gradually sold off. The connection to the Lodge has long gone and all the houses are now freehold, but even today there appears to be a sense of community or at least looking out for each other.

    The name 'Brickyard' dates to before 1861 and refers to a brickyard situated in an area on the eastern side of the road before the first house. It probably came into existence in the 1850's, as the 1851 Census only mentions Ivy Cottage.

    On the western side there are six brick dwellings in three blocks; number one is nearest to the north and the parish boundary. In the 1861 Census five of the dwellings that are listed are under the general collective name of 'Shirebrook'; the name refers to the nearby brook that divides Worcestershire from Warwickshire and Harvington from Salford; the houses are not mentioned in the 1851 Census.

    On the eastern side the situation is not so clear, there are now four properties: two semi-detached houses, built between 1871 and 1881, numbered 7 & 8; a single dwelling called 'Twistlebeck', set back from the road, built between 1851 and 1861, once two dwellings, called 'Brickyard House' in `1861, numbered 9a & 9b; Boundary House, a single house and a modern replacement of a wattle and daub thatched cottage called Ivy Cottage that was divided into two dwellings, set in the angle of the parish boundary and numbered 10.

    When the Bomford and Hughes families divided the Bomford company, they split the ownership of Brickyard Cottages. The Bomfords had numbers 1 to 6, while the Hughes had, on the other side of the road, numbers 7 to 10. Some of the tenants who worked for either company had to move across the road so that, for instance, the Bomford workers ended up occupying numbers 1 to 6.

    Number One: West side paired with number two. 1838 map reference: 1


    Number one, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1861 Census maybe Thomas Mansell and family or Isaac Grandeston and family were living here.

    In the 1871 Census John Haines and his family were living here.

    In the 1881, 1891 and 1901 Census Robert Cole and his family were living here.

    In 1911 George Harwood and his family were living here.

    In 1949 this was the home of Fred Homans and his wife Rose. Frederick A Homans married Rose Emily Lenmin/Lenman in 1941. They had issue:-

    1. Jean P, born 1942.

    The next occupants were Fred and Sheila Haines with sons Cliff and Michael. In the late 1960's they moved to number 7.

    The next occupants were Mr and Mrs Vallender and family, including Gordan their son. The house was then sold by the Johnson.

    The next occupants and owners were Peter and Anne Husband who live here in 2017.

    Number Two: West side paired with number one. 1838 map reference: 1


    Number two, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1861 Census maybe Thomas Mansell and family or Isaac Grandeston and family were living here.

    In the 1871 and 1881 Census Richard Field and his family were living here.

    In the 1891 and 1901 Census Thomas Brewer and his family were living here.

    In 1911 W A Smith and his family were living here.

    David Blake and his wife Betty were thought to have lived here with their son Eric. David was born 23 Jan 1908, he married in 1936 to Betty M Barley, born 10 July 1914. They had a son called Eric D., born in 1937. They are mentioned in the 1939 Census as living at Brickyards.

    David's brother, Albert Richard, (born 6 Oct 1902) and Frances (born 14 Feb 1901) Blake lived here until the late 1960's when they had to move to number 7. They were married in 1928, Frances's maiden name was Gerrish. They had a son called Clifford (Cliff) T., born 1930 and married in Rugby 1951 to Kathleen M Leech. Bert Blake, was foreman at P Hughes Ltd lived here. Albert died in 1974.

    Then Reg and Kath Harwood. Reg used to live in Atch Lench. Reginald W Harwood married Kathleen Allen in 1932. Reg was born 5th Aug 1907. Kath was born 29th Sep 1910. In 1939 they were living, possibly in Rowberry Cottages, with Fanny Allen who was born 3rd April 1866.

    Then John and Judy Branson.

    Now Clive and Hillary Tilleridge.

    Number Three: West side paired with number four. 1838 map reference: 1


    Number three, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1861 Census maybe Thomas Mansell and family or Isaac Grandeston and family were living here.

    In the 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 George Benton and his family were living here. In 1939 Ada K Benton, born 10 Oct 1879 was living here.

    Harold and Annie Moulden moved here from number 9, probably in 1969. When they passed away, their daughter Kathleen, who had married in 1954 to Frederick L Baldwin, moved in. Fred and Kathleen had been living in a thatched cottage in Abbots Salford. They passed away in 2015/6. See the Moulden Family under 'Hill Farm'.

    The property was sold by the Johnson's at Harvington Lodge in 2017.

    Number Four: West side paired with number three. 1838 map reference: 1


    Number four, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 Census George Brookes and his family were living here.

    Thomas Dutton, lived here with his wife Ethel with their daughters Margaret and Joan in the 1960's. In 1949 they were living at number 8. When Tom died his sister Eva moved in from number 8. In 1949 Eva and Fanny Dutton were living at 'Thatched Cottage' (number 10).

    The Dutton Family:-
    Alfred Herbert Dutton, born Cropthorne 4th Sep 1859. He was married at Woodstock 1885 to Fanny Simons, born 1st June 1859. In 1911 Alfred was living in Salford Priors as a shepherd on farm. Alfred died 1946 aged 86. Fanny died 1952 aged 92. They had issue:-

    1. Mary, born 19th Sep 1886. Living at home in 1911.
    2. Thomas H Dutton, born 25th Nov 1888. Living at home in 1911. He married Ethel, born 4th Nov 1894. They had issue:-
      1. Margaret
      2. Joan
    3. Eva Nellie, born 13th Feb 1891. Living at home in 1911.
    4. Agnes, born 1894, living at home in 1911.
    5. Arthur, born 1897, living at home in 1911, aged 14.

    They were followed by Eric and Margaret Crossley. They passed away within a week of each other in 2015/6.

    Greg and Fiona bought the place in 2017.

    Number Five: West side paired with number six. 1838 map reference: 1


    Number five, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1861,1871 and 1881 George Sherwood and his family were living here.

    In the 1891, 1901 and 1911 Census Edwin Jones and his family were living here.

    In the 1940-60's Teddy Smith and his wife lived here. He worked as a gardener at Salford Lodge. They had a disabled son called Frank. Edward J Smith, was born 5th Dec 1868. His wife Emily C, was born 5th Feb 1872. Their son Albert Edward Frank, was born 25th Jul 1901.

    The next family were Doug and Kate Swinbourne. Douglas E Swinbourne was married in the Pershore area 1963 to Kathleen M Hemming. They had a daughter Susan Jayne, born 1966. They were tenants to Harvington Lodge.

    The next family were William and Paulene Lawrence who purchased the property from the Johnsons at Harvington Lodge. They sold the house to Eric and Anne Cross in 2009.

    Number Six: West side paired with number five. 1838 map reference: 1


    Number six, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 Census Job Newman and his family were living here.

    These Newmans came of Atch Lench and do not appear to be related to the Newmans of Crooked Walls. Much information has been gathered from Margaret Bull of Birmingham whose grandfather was William Newman and also from a contributor to Ancestry.com.

    In 1911 Annie Newman lived here.

    In 1949 Ann Newman was the occupier. See the page on Families for a full account of this Newman family.

    George Marshall succeeded the Newmans in the early 1960's. He worked for the Bomfords at Harvington Lodge Estate for over forty years and respected them as they did him. He cared for Ms Bomford for five years until she died suddenly and the Estate was sold. He still lives (2017) at number 6 with his wife Doreen. Doreen is the daughter of Mr and Mrs Buttler of Hawkes Piece and Rose Villa. Much of the later information on the houses at Brickyard Cottages has been kindly supplied by George and Doreen.

    The Marshall Family
    John Marshall, born Pershore circa 1869. The married Rose E, aged 30 in 1901. John was a market gardener. They had issue:-

    1. Edward, aged 7 in 1901.
    2. Philip Charles Marshall, born 1895, of Sheriffs Lench, joined WW1 when he was 16. He married in 1919 to Kate L Roles and they later lived in Norton. Some of their children, are listed under the mother's surname of 'Rose' although it should read Roles. They had issue:-
      1. Charles, born as Edward P C 1920. Lived at Bricklehampton.
      2. John, born as Leslie J 1921. He married Margaret A Lampitt in 1946. They lived at Keeper's Cottage and then moved to Blakenhurst in the early 1960's. Margaret's sister Nancy and Bernard Oakey and lived in Keeper's Cottage after John and Margaret had left. John and Margaret had issue:-
        1. Leslie J, born 1946.
        2. Thomas, born 1952.
      3. Douglas, born 1923. He married Eileen Moss and lived in Moss' shop.
      4. Joan Edith, born 1925. She lived in Church Lench.
      5. Thomas, born 1928. He lived in Norton.
      6. George, born 1930 and now(2018) living at No.6 The Brickyard, Harvington.
      7. Christopher, birth not traced. He lived in Church Lench and Evesham.
    3. Elsie, aged 3 in 1901.
    4. Jack, aged 1 in 1901.

    Number Seven: East side paired with number eight. 1838 map reference: 96


    Number seven, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1881 and 1891 Census John Clements and his family were living here.

    In the 1901 Census George Rouse and family or Mary Newman and family lived here.

    In 1911 Arthur Brewer and his family were living here.

    Mr Fred and Mrs Sheila Haines were the tenants, they moved to number 1 in the late 1960's.

    Albert (Bert) and Frances Blake moved in from number two in the late 1960's. Albert died in 1974.

    Nick and Rachel Seller purchased the house.

    The present (2017) owners are Mr M and Mrs Churchill.

    Number Eight: East side paired with number 7. 1838 map reference: 96


    Number eight, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1881 Census William Valender and his family were living here

    In the 1891 Census Herbert Jones and his family were living here.

    In the 1901 Census George Rouse and family or Mary Newman and family lived here.

    In the 1911 Census Charles Edward Ludlow and his wife were living here with their two children George and William.

    George and Doreen Marshall from number 6, remembered an unknown lady living here before Robin and Audrey Trow. She was Winifred Howell Skinner and had married Edward Charles Ludlow in 1899. Her husband had died in 1926. She lived here until 1954 when she presumably moved and died in the Coventry area in 1955 aged 82. See Ludlow Family under Families.

    In the 1949 Electoral Roll 'number 8, The Brickyards, was apparently occupied by David, Frances, Betty and Albert Blake but this is probably an error and should at least not include David and Betty who were very likely living at number two.

    In 1954 Robin and Audrey Trow and family moved in and they are still here in 2017.

    Number Nine: East side, a rendered property built in the 1850's. 1838 map reference: 97


    Number nine, Brickyard Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This L-shaped property, set back from the road, was known in 1861 as 'Brickyard House'. From the beginning it was divided into two dwellings, one facing the road and one facing number eight. In 1971 they were joined into one and called 'Twistlebeck'.

    Facing front (No.9a):
    In the 1861 and 1871 Census Hemming Cresswell and his family were living here.

    In the 1881 and 1891 and 1911 Census Job Stanley and his family were living here.

    Job Stanley is missing from the 1901 Census.

    Charles Langstone and his wife and daughter Joan and Tom (Frank) Newman lived here. Joan died and Tom Newman, who was brother to Jack Newman at number 10, married Violet and had two boys, Peter and Robert. See under Families.

    Thomas (Frank), born Harvington 10 Sep 1903. He was 1stly married in 1938 to Joan, born 28 Aug 1910, daughter of Charles Langstone of the Brickyards. Joan died and he married 2ndly in Birmingham in 1948 to Voilet Jinks. They lived at number 7, Brickyard Cottages. Frank died in 1978. Violet died in 1998.
    He had issue by Joan:-

    1. Alan Layrd Kenneth
    He had issue by Violet:-
    1. Peter
    2. Robert
    In 1939 Charles and Ellen Langstone were living at Brickyard Cottages, while Frank and Joan Newman were living next door.

    In 1939 two evacuees from Birmingham, Rosa Fisher, aged 6 and cousin Dorothy Keay, aged 9 were taken in.

    The Newman Family left the Brickyards circa 1957 and went to No.1 Rowberry Cottages.

    Facing side (No.9b):
    In the 1861, 1871 and 1881 Census James Spink and his family were living here.

    In the 1891 Census Thomas Farr was living here.

    In the 1901 and 1911 Census John Brookes and his family was living here.

    In 1939 Harold and Annie Moulden were living here with their daughter Kathleen and were probably still living here until the late 1960's when they moved over the road to number three.

    Joined
    The two properties were purchased in 1971 by Ken Rowbottom and his wife who joined them into one. Ken passed away in 2003, his widow still (2017) lives here.

    Number ten: East side, Boundary House, rendered property built one the site of a thatched cottage. 1838 map reference: 98


    Ivy Cottage/Boundary House - then and now.
    The lady in picture was an aunt of the Managhans.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The origin of the original property, divided into two from at least 1841, is unknown. From the only known photograph of the old cottage, it was at least eighteenth century and probably earlier. As remembered by George and Doreen Marshall, the thatch greatly overhung the front wall of the property, whereas on the back it did not. The front was covered in ivy, hence the name 'Ivy Cottage'. There was a central chimney servicing two inglenooks for the two, one up, one down, dwellings and stairs or rungs in the front near the inglenooks for access to the upper floors. The cottage had flag stone floors and was low so the upper rooms were much narrower and fitted into the eaves of the roof. The only light upstairs was from small windows at each end, one can note a circular window in the south gable end. The photograph indicates that this gable-end was of brick, which probably replaced one of timber. The house was named Thatched Cottage in one Census but it was called Ivy Cottage from at least 1861. George and Doreen also remember that in its later years when the thatch was in decay, it was partly roofed with corrugated sheets.

    Cottage 10a:
    In the 1841, 1851 and 1861 Census William Pestridge, and his family were living here.

    William Pestridge, died 1854, aged 84. His wife Mary was living in 1851, aged 70.

    In the 1871 Census Charles Ludlow and his family was living here.

    In the 1881 Census John Hanks was living here.

    In the 1891 and 1901 Census Francis Smith and his family were living here.

    In the 1911 Census Joseph Bailey and his family were living here.

    Jack Newman and his wife Alice lived here till 1969 with their daughter Janet and grandson called Dallas. John Henry (Jack), born 20 Aug 1893, married Alice Bailey, born 6 Aug 1890, in 1921. Their daughter Evelyn J was born in 1922. Evelyn married Jack P N Crofton in 1946. Evelyn and Jack had Dallas M N in 1946. Jack Newman died in 1965. See under Families, Newman No.1 for his family.

    Named 'Ivy Cottage' in both 1939 and 1949 occupied by John and Alice Newman.

    Cottage 10b:
    In the 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871 1881 Census Thomas Brewer and his family living here along with George Harris. Thomas Brewer came from Suffolk.

    In the 1891 Census George Ludlow and his family were living here

    In the 1901 and 1911 Census George Ludlow and his family were living here.

    In 1939 Bertie J Hartwell was living with Thomas and Ethel Dutton.

    Dutton Family
    Thomas H and Ethel M Dutton lived here in 1939. In 1949 it was described as 'Thatched Cottage' and was occupied by Fanny and Eva Dutton. They had issue:-

    1. Margaret
    2. Joan, married Terry Bradshaw of 32 Orchard Place. In 1949 they were living here. They had issue:-
      1. Paul, living 33 Orchard Place


    In 1969 the two properties were bought by Mr L and Mrs Managhan who built Boundary House where they lived with their son John, who still (2017) lives here.

    Brickyards - unplaced: The following families and individuals are unplaced. Note that in 1891 Robert Newman was living in and thereby employed at Harvington Lodge.
    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 Arthur W and Ellen Hancock were possibly living in one of the Brickyard Cottages.

    In 1949 Ada K Benton was living in one of the Brickyard cottages.

    NEWMAN FAMILY (3)
    This family was living 1901 in either number 7 or 8. Robert Newman, of a different family to the other Newmans, was born in Little Compton 1831. Ag Lab in 1891 living at ‘The Lodge (Harvington Lodge), Leys Road, Harvington’. He was Married Shipston on Stour in 1856, Mary Bailey born Brailes 1836. Living at ‘The Brickyard’ Harvington 1901. Mary had a sister Ann Hyatt, born Brailes 1834. They had issue:

    1. Richard George, born Shipston on Stour in 1857. He married Emma Tombs in Shipston on Stour in 1878 and raised a large family in Paxford.
    2. James, born Charingsworth 1861. An idiot.
    3. Thomas (Tom), born Charingsworth 1895. An idiot.
    4. Robert, died in infancy.

    The 1911 Census, lists the following families as living at 'The Brickyard', and owing to Winifred Ludlow at No.8, and Annie Newman at No.6, one can ascertain where the other families were living and that the enumerator worked in a consistant manner. This process has been continued backwards and most of the families have been located. The Census for 1901 was the most challenging as the enumerator did not keep any order.

    BREWER, Arthur, Jane, Elsie [No.7]
    LUDLOW, Edward, Winifred, George, William. [No.8]
    STANLEY, Job, WESTBURY, Alfred, Eleanor, Beatrice, Eva [No.9a]
    BROOKES, Fanny, George Dennis, James Basil [No.9b]
    BAILEY, Joseph, Emma, Elizabeth [No.10a]
    LUDLOW, George, Elizabeth, Mary [No.10b]
    HARWOOD, Geo, Ernest, Kate [No.1]
    SMITH, W, A K, F W, Francis, Herbert, Victor [No.2]
    BENTON, Ann, John Fraser, Samuel Edgar [No.3]
    BROOKES, George, Sarah, Thomas, Sarah Ann, Elizabeth [No.4]
    JONES, Elizabeth [No.5]
    NEWMAN, Annie [No.6]

    The 1901 Census
    BROOKES, John, Fanny, Dennis [No.9b]
    JONES, Edwin, Elizabeth, William [No.5]
    BENTON, George, Ann, Samuel Edgar, John, Fraser, [No.3]
    LUDLOW, George, Elizabeth, Mary [No.10b]
    BROOKES, George, Sarah, Sarah Ann, Elizabeth [No.4]
    BREWER, Thomas, Jane, Fanny, May, Arthur, Elsie [No.2]
    NEWMAN, Job, Annie [No.6]
    SMITH, Sarah Jane, Frederick Wm, Francis, Herbert, Horace Sydney, Albert Victor [No.10a]
    ROUSE, George, Fanny Elizabeth [No. 7 or 8]
    NEWMAN, Mary, James, Tom, HYATT, Ann, BAILEY, Thomas [No.7 or 8]
    COLE, Robert, Alice, Ernest John [No.1]
    [There are only 11 out of the 12 dwellings listed and Job Stanley, who was living at number 9a in 1891 and 1911 is not mentioned.]

    The 1891 Census
    NEWMAN, Job, Hannah [N.6]
    JONES, Edwin, Elizabeth [No.5]
    BROOKES, George, Sarah, Annie, John, Bessy, Thomas, Lucy [No.4]
    BENTON, George, Anne, Samuel E [No.3]
    BREWER, Thomas, Jane, Ada, George, Lucy, Fanny, May, Arthur [No.2]
    COLE, Robert, Alice, Albert, Reginald, Amelia, Henry, Ernest [No.1]
    SMITH, Francis, Sarah J [No.10a]
    LUDLOW, George, Elizabeth, Emily M [No.10b]
    STANLEY, Job, Hannah, Job, Sarah A, Constantine A [No.9a]
    FARR, Thomas [No.9b]
    JONES, Herbert, Elizabeth [No.8]
    CLEMENTS, John, Elizabeth, William F, Gertrude F, Daisy A, Jessie R, John, Lizzie [No.7]

    The 1881 Census
    SHERWOOD, George, Ann [No.5]
    NEWMAN, Job, Hannah, William, Thomas, BAYLIS, Charlotte [No.6]
    BROOKES, George, Sarah, Thomas, John [No.4]
    BENTON, George, Ann, Fraiser, Arthur, Edgar [No.3]
    FIELD, Richard, Mary A, John, William H, George E, Florence [No.2]
    COLE, Robert, Alice, Albert, Reginald, Amelia, Henry, Ernest [No.1]
    BREWER, Elizabeth [No.10b]
    HANKS, John, Ann, MORGAN, Annie M, Sarah A [No.10a]
    STANLEY, Job, Hannah, William, George, Ann, Job, Sarah A, Constantine, A [No.9a]
    SPINK, Harriet, GUISE, Harriet, SPINK, Frederick Sarah, Annie [No.9b]
    VALENDER, William, Mary A [No.8]
    CLEMENTS, John, Elizabeth, Frederick W, Fanney [No.7]

    In 1871 Census
    NEWMAN, Job, Hannah, Ann, George, William, Thomas [No.6]
    SHERWOOD, George, Ann, George [No.5]
    BENTON, George, Ann, John W, Arthur H [No.3]
    BROOKS, George, Sarah, Thomas, Sarah A, John, Elizabeth [No.4]
    HAINES, John, Martha, Mary, Florence E, ------ [No.1]
    FIELD, Richard, Mary A, Charles, John, William H, Fanny [No.2]
    LUDLOW, Charles, Elizabeth, Emily, Philip, Edward, William, Herbert [No.10a]
    BREWER, Thomas, Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth [No.10b]
    CRESSWELL, Hemming, Emma, Ellen, William [No.9a]
    SPINK, James, Harriett, Elizabeth, Harriett, Charles, Henry, Frederick, Ellen, Mary A, Sarah A [No.9b]

    In 1861 Census
    CRESSWELL, Hemming, Emma - Brickyard House [No.9a]
    SPINK, James, Harriet, James, Elizabeth, Harriet, Charles, Henry - Brickyard House [No.9b]
    BREWER, Thomas, Mary, Sarah - Ivy Cottage [No.10b]
    PESTRIDGE, Mary, BREWER, Elizabeth - Ivy Cottage [No.10a]
    NEWMAN, Job, Hannah, Ann, WHAITON, John, WILLIAMS, Eliza - Shirebrook [No.6]
    MANSELL, Thomas, Ann, John, William, Thomas - Shirebrook - unplaced
    GRANDESTEN, Isaac, Elizabeth, Kesia, Jane H - Shirebrook unplaced
    BROOKS, George, Sarah, Thomas - Shirebrook [No.4]
    SHERWOOD, George, Ann, William, Mary, Ann, George - Shirebrook [No.5]

    In 1851 Census
    BREWER, Thomas, Mary, George, John, Sarah, Thomas, Henry Elizabeth - Cottage on Road to Alcester {No.10b]
    PESTRIDGE, William, Mary, SMITH, John - Cottage road to Alcester [No.10a]

    In 1841 Census
    BREWER, Thomas, Mary, William, George, John, HARRIS, George - dwelling not indicated [No.10b]
    PRESTRIDGE, William, Mary, Sarah, Dinah - dwelling not indicated [No.10a]

    Candle Cottage: Timber framed thatched cottage. Apparently formerly named 'Bess' Cottage. 1838 map reference: 174


    Candle Cottage, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Candle Cottage The tiny timber-framed thatched cottage, is thought to date from the 17th century. It stands on the corner of Church Street and Anchor Lane and backs on to the churchyard which is surrounded at this point by a substantial Blue Lias stone wall. This part of the churchyard was extended sometime in the nineteenth century to include the village pound. It is probable that the land containing Candle Cottage, Church House and Church Cottage was an encroachment plot being once part of common land put aside for the village pound. The cottage may have been built for the villager responsible for the pound.

    The Deeds of Candle Cottage indicate that the plot covering the three properties was owned in 1859 by Edward Skinner, the elder and they remained under the various members of the Skinner family until the 1960's.

    On inspection of the inside, plus the plan in the 1968 conveyance, it is clear that Candle Cottage, tiny as it is, was once divided into, a rear part, identified as 'Station Bank Cottage' and a front part, identified as 'Chandler Cottage'. Although the two lower rooms have access to each other, there is no access between the two upper rooms. There is also a double inglenook for the two parts plus, until recently (2017), one staircase for the rear and fixed steps for the front part. The two parts were joined under one freehold ownership in 1968 to become Bess Cottage.

    The first recorded name for Candle Cottage that we have is Station Bank Cottage for the rear part in 1939 and possibly Chandler Cottage for the front part of Candle Cottage. Census. Before then it was described in the Deeds as the cottage on the corner of Holloway (now Anchor Lane). In the conveyance of 1973 it was called Bess Cottage, presumably called so by Arthur Skinner after the unification of the property. It was still called Bess Cottaghe in 1985.

    Skinner Family and their tenants
    The first document in the Deeds of Candle Cottage is a 'Schedule of Documents' covering Church House, Cottage and Candle Cottge, dated 1868. It refers back to the Will of Edward Skinner, the elder, dated 15th July 1857, proved 24th Feb 1862, Edward died in 1861. Edward gave his "cottage, garden and pigsties and premises attached", to his son Edward Skinner on the proviso that he should give £10 to each of his siblings. Edward the elder’s widow and Edward the younger's mother Elizabeth, village post mistress, was in occupation. By 1868 we find that Edward the elders brother Charles Skinner senior owned Church Cottage and Candle Cottage. From this time it appears that the freehold of Church Cottage and Candle Cottage is separate from that of Church House.

    In 1868 Charles the elder, a tailor, of Harvington, conveyed part of the property to his nephew Charles Skinner, a Fly Driver, of Worcester and part to Jesse Skinner, the younger brother of Edward the younger. Charles the elder appears to have occupied Church Cottage until his death in 1868.

    On 6th Jan 1877 Charles Skinner, Fly Driver of Worcester, sold to John Skinner (younger son of Edward Skinner the elder, of Birmingham), a piece of land fronting Holloway Road (Anchor Lane) on the one side, churchyard, and a cottage (Candle Cottage) occupied by Caleb Skinner and of Elizabeth Skinner, widow. The same were of late in the occupation of Charles Skinner (elder, died 1868) but now occupied by Mrs Bourton widow. Mrs Bourton was still living there in 1881. Her details are Elizabeth Bourton, born Littleton aged 68 in 1881, widow. She was head of household with son Charles, born Harvington aged 30 in 1881, he was an ag lab.

    In the 1910's Ernest Ludlow and his wife Mary Ann (Polly) Locke lived in the front part of Candle Cottage where their three children Philip W, Lucy E, and Florence E, were born in 1912, 1913 & 1916. By 1939 Ernest and Mary Ann Ludlow were living 3 Malthouse cottages. See Ludlow family under 'Families' for more detail of the Ludlow family.

    1913 Elizabeth Skinner owned Station Bank Cottage and Caleb Skinner lived in Chandler Cottage. Previously Elizabeth and Caleb Skinner had lived in Church House and Cottage while Charles Ludlow had lived in Chandler Cottage and Mrs Bourton occupied Station Bank Cottage.

    Jesse Skinner was living in Station Bank Cottage until shortly before his death in 1920. In 1927 it was occupied by Allan Skinner. Ownership later passed to Arthur Allman Skinner.

    On 9th Oct 1926 a conveyance was made between Ellen Louisa Skinner and others to Mrs Ellen Louisa Skinner and Arthur Allman Skinner both of 16 Westgate Barnfield Urmston, Lancs. and Doris Ellen Skinner of the same place spinster, to Ellen Louisa Skinner. Charles Edward Skinner had died 30th Mar 1926 intestate, leaving Ellen Louisa his widow and Arthur and Doris his only children. The property called Church House, was lately occupied by Elizabeth Maude Marks, but now occupied by Nora Eugene Wilkinson as tenant. Caleb Skinner occupies Candle Cottage (died 1924), which was formerly occupied by Charles Skinner and Mrs Bourton, and now occupied by Percy Tansell as tenant.

    In 1939 'Station Bank' was occupied by Frederick G and Esther A Barrett and Percy and Alice Tansell.

    In 1949 'Station Bank Cottage' was occupied by Gladys Cadwallader. Gladys was a very small vibrant and pleasant lady who lived to be over a hundred, she had a daughter called Lilian and a son called George. Joy of Crooked Walls remembered back in the late 1970's as living in a bungalow in Station Road. By 1968 Arthur Allman Skinner was living in Station Bank.

    On 15th February 1968, Church Cottage was conveyed by Ruth Elizabeth Morgan and Florence Betty Fox to Michael Philip Thompson. Michael Thompson later purchased Church House.

    On 16th February 1968 a conveyance made between Ruth Elizabeth Morgan, of 6 London Road, Cheltenham, Glos and Florence Betty Fox, the wife of Ronald Fox of 43 Foxhill Road, Timperley, Altrincham, Cheshire, of the one part and Arthur Allan Skinner of Station Bank Cottage, retired engineer. Jesse Skinner, Market Gardener, had died in 1920 aged 86. His probate was dated 18th June 1920. His executors Rowland Elam Spiers and Charles Ludlow were trustees. He left Church House and Cottage to Mr Spiers and Mr Ludlow upon trust to permit his housekeeper Sarah Weaver to receive the rents and profits during her life and afterwards to Florence Morgan during her lifetime and then to her offspring. Florence Morgan died on 17th Nov 1965 having had two daughters.

    Morgan
    Sarah Weaver was the housekeeper to Jesse Skinner when he died in 1920. He left Sarah as tenant in a trust for life his property Church Cottage and the front part (Chandler Cottage) of Candle Cottage. After her death on 3rd March 1927, occupancy was transferred to that of her niece Florence Morgan nÿe Ludlow.

    1. Florence Ludlow, daughter of Charles Ludlow, 1840-1926. She married William Douglas Morgan in 1914. She was a housekeeper to her uncle John Skinner in Handsworth, he was a jeweller. In 1927 she was living at 11 Fox Green Crescent, Acocks Green, Birmingham. She lived for many years in the front part of Candle Cottage. She had issue:-
      1. Florence Betty, born Harvington 1920. She married Ronald Fox and was living in 1968 at 43 Foxhill Road, Timperley, Altrincham, Cheshire.
      2. Dorothy M, born Harvington 1921.
      3. Ruth Elizabeth, born in Kings Norton in 1923. In 1968 she was living at 6 London Road, Cheltenham, Glos.

    Upon the death of Florence Morgan on 17th November 1965, the front part (Chandler Cottage) of Candle Cottage was conveyed on 16th February 1968 to Arthur Allman Skinner, retired engineer, of Station Band Cottage.

    Stocking
    On 3rd August 1973, Margaret Eileen Stocking, formerly of 19 Pump Street, Malvern, Worcs., but now of 'Bess' Cottage (formerly Station Bank Cottage), sold the property to Harold Vivian and David Michael Gwyther, of 11 Castle Green, Weybridge, Surrey. There is no surviving conveyance between Arthur Allman Skinner and Margaret Stocking. Arthur Skinner died in 1972 and it is assumed that she was his executor.

    Gwyther
    On 22nd February 1976 Harold Vivian Gwyther, of 8 Ricardo Road, Minchinhampton, Glos & David Michael Gwyther, of School House, 8 Crown Close, Bromsgrove, Worcs., sold Bess Cottage to Stephen John Richards, of 6 Aldridge Road, Streetly, West Mids.

    Richards
    On 11th October 1978 Stephen John Richards Esq, sold Bess Cottage to John William Anthony Phillips and Eleanor Mary Jean Phillips of 14 Rhydypenau Road, Guncoed Cardiff.

    Philips
    On 8th August 1980 Mr John William & Mrs Eleanor Mary Jean Phillips, of Bess Cottage, Anchor Lane sold the property to Mr Paul Victor Barnett, of 14 Jalan Langgak Duta Taman Duta Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Mrs Teresa Mary Barnett of Wallingstone Cottage, Tre-Essey St Weonards in Herefordshire.

    Barnett
    On 26th July 1985 Bess Cottage, Anchor Lane was conveyed by Paul Victor of Bays Cottage, Hensham, Hertfordshire and Mrs Teresa Mary Barnett of Bess Cottage to Anthony John Barnett of 14 Sydney Grove, Hendon, London.

    gap

    France
    The present (2016) owner is Mrs Annette France.

    Occupiers

    • Charles Skinner elder, 1868- (poss. rear)
    • Mrs Bourton, 1877 (poss front)
    • Percy Tansell, 1939
    • Caleb Skinner, 1913
    • Elizabeth Skinner, 1913 (rear)
    • Ernest Ludlow, 1912-1916 (front)
    • Jesse Skinner, -1920
    • Charles Skinner, 1926 (rear)
    • Percy Tansell, 1926 (front)
    • Allan Skinner, 1927
    • Frederick G Barrett, 1939
    • Gladys Cadwallader, 1949 (rear)
    • Florence Morgan, 1965 (front)
    • Arthur Allman Skinner, 1968 (rear)
    • Margaret Stocking, 1972-1973 (combined)


    PROPERTY DEEDS
    The Property
    Deeds these are the deeds to Candle Cottage up until the time when the the property was registered. The Deed were made available for this site by the present (2016) owner Mrs Annette France. The material ranges from 1862 to 1985.

    Cedar Lodge: A large Victorian brick house built 1874.

    1838 map reference: 78


    Cedar Lodge, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    There is much information that has been gathered about the property so a sub webpage has been created. Please click here for more details on
    Cedar Lodge.

    Chandler Cottage: Part of Candle Cottage. 1838 map reference: 174
    Church Cottage: Church Cottage was built alongside, either as a separate dwelling or as an extension of Church House.

    1838 map reference: 175


    Church Cottage & House, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The history of Church Cottage is inextricably entwined with that of Church House and Candle Cottage, please see under Candle Cottage. It is not known when Church Cottage was built but both house and cottage appear to be depicted upon the 1838 estate map. The two properties were owned by the Skinner family from at least the 1850's and remained so until the 1960's. Both Church House and Cottage are similar in architecture but it is clear that Church Cottage was a later addition. The interior is not what it seems from the outside. The room to the left of the front door of Church House is part of Church Cottage, making Church Cottage larger and Church House smaller then appears from the outside.

    Neither Church Cottage or House appear to have any surviving deeds so we have to rely on the deeds of Candle Cottage for information about the Skinner Family's ownership. In fact up to 1968 the deeds of Candle Cottage may well be the deeds of all three properties. The freehold of the three properties descended through various members of the family which makes for a difficult and complex understanding of who owned what.

    Skinner Family and their tenants
    The first document in the Deeds of Candle Cottage is a 'Schedule of Documents' dated 1868. It refers back to the Will of Edward Skinner, the elder, dated 15th July 1857, proved 24th Feb 1862, Edward died in 1861. Edward gave his "cottage, garden and pigsties and premises attached", to his son Edward Skinner on the proviso that he should give £10 to each of his siblings. Edward the elder’s widow and Edward the younger's mother Elizabeth, village post mistress, was in occupation. If his son Edward defaulted then the property was to be sold and his uncle Charles senior should have first refusal. This may have happened as we find that in 1868 Charles Skinner the elder and Edward's brother is in possession of Church Cottage and Candle Cottage but Charles may have already been the owner of these properties. From at least 1868 the freehold of Church Cottage and Candle Cottage is separate from that of Church House.

    In 1868 Charles the elder, tailor of Harvington conveyed part of the property to Charles Skinner the younger, Fly Driver of Worcester and Jesse Skinner, son of Edward the younger. Charles the elder appears to have been in occupation of Church Cottage until 1868 and then moved into Candle Cottage, while Edward the elder's widow Elizabeth Skinner carried on her business in Church House.

    On 4th Feb 1868 there was a gift made between this Charles Skinner the elder and Charles Skinner the younger, eldest son of Edward Skinner his brother.

    On 31st Jan 1873 Charles Skinner the elder, sold his part of the properties (Church Cottage) to Jesse Skinner, the younger son of Edward Skinner the elder.

    6th Jan 1877 Charles Skinner, Fly Driver of Worcester, sold the properties to John Skinner (younger son of Edward Skinner the elder, of Birmingham, a piece of land fronting Holloway Road (Anchor Lane) on the one side, churchyard, and a cottage (Chandler Cottage) occupied by Caleb Skinner, and also of Elizabeth Skinner, widow. The same were of late in the occupation of Charles Skinner (Uncle) but now occupied by Mrs Bourton widow.

    1920
    Jesse Skinner, died in 1920 aged 86, his probate dated 18th June 1920 names his executors as Rowland Elam Spiers and Charles Ludlow as trustees. He left Church Cottage and Candle Cottage to Mr Spiers and Mr Ludlow upon trust to permit his housekeeper Sarah Weaver (believed to be living in Church Cottage), to receive the rents and profits during her life and afterwards to Florence Morgan, her niece, during her lifetime and then to Florence's offspring.

    9th Oct 1926. Abstract of title and conveyance between Ellen Louisa Skinner widow to her her son Arthur Allman Skinner both of 16 Westgate Barnfield Urmston, Lancs. and Doris Ellen Skinner of same address. At this time Church House was lately occupied by Elizabeth Maude Marks and then in occupation of Nora Eugenie Wilkinson as tenant. C E Skinner died 21st Jun 1913. In 1913 it was in the occupation of Elizabeth Skinner and then of Caleb Skinner but at date of abstracting deed, of John Cook and formerly used as the village Post Office and then known as 'The Old Post Office'.

    On 24th August 1927 a vesting assent describes Jesse Skinner, deceased, William Edward Stead Meek Market gardener of Harvington and wife Mabel Kate Meek to Mrs Florence Morgan of 11 Fox Green Crescent Adcocks Green, Birmingham as tenant for life. Jesse Will dated 18th June 1920, appointing Rowland Elam Spiers and Charles Ludlow as trustees. Made trust for Sarah Weaver to receive rents during her life and at her death to her niece. Rowland Spiers died on 13th July 1926. Charles Ludlow died 30th Aug 1926 whose Will appointed Mr & Mrs Meek as executors. Sarah Weaver died 3rd March 1927. Firstly Jesse Skinner occupied brick built Church Cottage until his death in 1920 aged 86, afterwards occupied by Sarah Weaver until her death and now occupied by Miss White. In the 1930 Electoral Roll Jessie Elizabeth White was living in Church Cottage. She was born in Aston in 1857, the daughter of Edward and Jane White, she died in 1936 aged 79.

    24th Aug 1927. Vesting between William Edward Stead Meek and Mabel Kate Meek of one part and Florence Morgan of other part.

    14th Mar 1927. Will dated, of Ellen Louisa Skinner of 16 Westgate Barnfield Urmston, Lancs., appointed her son Arthur Allman Skinner and her daughter Doris Ellen Skinner her executors hereby devising her freehold properties in Harvington of her late husband Charles Edward Skinner to her son Arthur Allman Skinner absolutely.

    Church Cottage appears to be occupied by Ellen Louisa Skinner, wife of Arthur Allman Skinner. On 1st Oct 1944 Ellen Louisa Skinner died, her probate dated 6th Dec 1944 was to Arthur Allman Skinner & Doris Ellen Nightingale, her executors.

    17th Nov 1963. Florence Morgan, widow, daughter of Sarah Weaver, died on 17th Nov 1965, intestate. Her property passed to her two children Ruth Elizabeth Morgan spinster and Florence Betty Fox wife of Ronald Fox. 27th Jan 1966. In 1968 Ruth Elizabeth Morgan was living at 6 London Road, Cheltenham and Florence Betty Fox, was living at 43 Foxhall Road, Timperley, Altrincham.

    On 15th Feb 1968 there is a conveyance between Arthur Allman Skinner and Michael Philip Thompson of one part and Michael Philip Thompson of the other part of freehold known as Church House. It appears from the above that The Thompson family bought Church Cottage and Church House in 1968. In 1968 Candle Cottage was sold separately by Arthur Allman Skinner. Arthur Skinner was born on 4 Oct 1893 and died in Cheltenham in 1972.

    16th February 1968 a conveyance was made between Ruth Elizabeth Morgan of No.6, London Road, Cheltenham, Glos and Florence Betty Fox, the wife of Ronald Rox of 43 Foxhall Road, Timperley, Altrincham, Chester of the one part and Arthur Allan Skinner of Station Bank Cottage, retired engineer.

    On 15th Jan 1968 a conveyance between Ruth Elizabeth Morgan & Florence Betty Fox to Michael Philip Thompson of property known as Church Cottage. It is at this stage that the Skinners relinquish their hold on the property and Church Cottage is sold to the Thompson family.

    Thompson Family
    The Thompson's then purchased Church House. The Thompson's remained owners of both properties until about 2002.

    Castle Family
    The Castle brothers bought both properties from the Thompson family and have since kept the properties separate. Richard Castle lived in Church Cottage until moving to Mickleton and the cottage is now rented. His brother Jeremy lives (2017) in Church House.

    Occupiers

    • Charles Skinner elder, -1868
    • Caleb Skinner, 1868-1877
    • Sarah Weaver, -1927
    • Miss White, 1927
    • Ellen Louisa Skinner, - 1944
    • Lilian Cadallader, 1949
    • William Florence and Ruth Morgan, 1949-1962
    • Michael Philip Thompson, 1962-2002
    • Richard Castle, 2002-?

    Church House: Originally a brick house (Church House), it was built prior to 1838. Church Cottage was then built alongside, either as a separate dwelling or as an extension.

    1838 map reference: 175


    Church Cottage & House, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The history of Church House is inextricably entwined with that of Church Cottage and Candle. It is not known when Church House was built but both house and cottage appear to be depicted upon the 1838 estate map. The three properties were owned by the Skinner family from at least the 1850's and remained so until the 1960's. Both properties are similar in architecture but it is clear that Church House was the original building with the cottage being added at a later date. The interior is not what it seems from the outside. The room to the left of the front door of Church House is part of Church Cottage, making Church Cottage larger and Church House smaller then appears from the outside.

    Neither Church House nor Cottage appear to have any surviving deeds so we have to rely on the deeds of Candle Cottage for information about the Skinner Family's ownership. In fact up to 1968 the deeds of Candle Cottage may well be the deeds of all three properties. The freehold of the three properties descended through various members of the family which makes for a difficult and complex understanding of who owned what.

    Church House's first recorded name is 'The Old Post Office' in 1908, The property was run as a Post Office and shop from at least 1771, when the Census of that year states that Elizabeth Skinner, is the village 'Post Mistress'. She ran it until her death in 1880. By 1945 it was called Church House which has remained its name ever since.

    Skinner Family and their tenants
    The first document in the Deeds of Candle Cottage is a 'Schedule of Documents' dated 1868. It refers back to the Will of Edward Skinner, the elder, dated 15th July 1857, proved 24th Feb 1862, Edward died in 1861. Edward gave his "cottage, garden and pigsties and premises attached", to his son Edward Skinner on the proviso that he should give £10 to each of his siblings. Edward the elder’s widow and Edward the younger's mother Elizabeth, village post mistress, was in occupation. If his son Edward defaulted then the property was to be sold and his uncle Charles senior should have first refusal. This may have happened as we find that in 1868 Charles Skinner the elder and Edward's brother is in possession of Church Cottage and Candle Cottage but Charles may have already been the owner of these properties. From at least 1868 the freehold of Church Cottage and Candle Cottage is separate from that of Church House.

    On 25th Mar 1871 a mortgage was taken out on Church House by Edward Skinner from George Henry Garrard, (George Garrard was a solicitor in Evesham and appears on a number of village documents), and Mrs Elizabeth Skinner, widow of Edward Skinner the elder, and was the occupier of the property.

    24th July 1880 a conveyance between Edward Skinner (junior) and his mortgage to John Skinner, jeweller, lists seven children of Edward the elder and Elizabeth his wife. The deed names the seven children as Edward (junior), Jesse, John, Henry, Helen wife of Mr Parks, Elizabeth, wife of Charles Ludlow & Caleb. The described premises, tenement, garden and pigsties were late in occupation of Elizabeth Skinner but now Caleb Skinner. Elizabeth Skinner died in 1880 aged 80.

    In 1896 Church House was known as the 'Post Office', run by the Cook Family who leased the property from the Skinner family. Steve Cook, one of the village historians, was born here in 1910.

    On 27th Nov 1906 a lease was drawn up by John Skinner of 4 Northampton Street, Birmingham Jeweller to John Bazaled Cook of Harvington. The premises were described as on the main Stratford Road formerly used as a Post Office.

    On 18th Mar 1908 the Will of John Skinner deceased, appoints his son Walter Skinner and daughter Emma Elizabeth Skinner. His children were William John, Charles Edward, Sarah Alice, Joseph Henry, Emma Elizabeth, Mary Ann, Benjamin and Walter. William John & Emma Elizabeth are offered to purchase the Jeweller business in Birmingham. The document states that the Skinner's owned the Old Post Office, one cottage (Candle) and Oak Tree Villas, Cress Hill.

    Edward Skinner, junior, died in 1909 aged 78.

    On 21st June 1913 a conveyance between Walter Skinner, of Antrobus Road, Handsworth, Birmingham, Commercial Traveller and Emma Elizabeth Skinner, of Northampton Street, Birmingham as trustees of John (late) Skinner in which they sold their share to Charles Edward Skinner of Harvington, Derbyshire Lane, Shetford, Manchester. The property included the 'Old Post Office', the cottage (Church Cottage), plus Oak Tree Villas. The Testator (John Skinner) died on 26th Feb 1912. Cottage with garden pigsties premises etc. late in occupation of Elizabeth Skinner then of Caleb Skinner but now of John Cook, formerly used as a post office but now known as the Old Post Office. Also a plot bounded by Holloway, pound, churchyard and cottage formerly occupied by Caleb Skinner and abutting at back to Elizabeth Skinner's land joint use of well and formerly occupied by Charles Skinner and Mrs Bourton widow. The above states that Walter and Emma sold the Church House and Candle Cottage to Charles Edward Skinner.

    On 2nd Oct 1926 'Church House' was leased for three years by Ellen Louisa Skinner widow and Arthur Allman Skinner Salesman both of 16 Westgate Urmston, Lancs., to Nora Eugenia Wilkinson of Manor House, Hamstead, Birmingham, spinster.

    On 9th Oct 1926 a conveyance was made between Ellen Louisa Skinner and others to Mrs Ellen Louisa Skinner and Arthur Allman Skinner both of 16 Westgate Barnfield Urmston of and Doris Ellen Skinner of the same place spinster to Ellen Louisa Skinner. Charles Edward Skinner had died 30th Mar 1926 intestate, leaving Ellen Louisa widow and Arthur and Doris his only children. The property called Church House, lately occupied by Elizabeth Maude Marks, who died Birmingham 1942 aged 77, but now occupied by Nora Eugene Wilkinson as tenant. Nore Wilkinson died Sutton Coldfield in 1949 aged 86. Caleb Skinner either occupies Candle Cottage or Church Cottage, which was formerly occupied by Charles Skinner and Mrs Bourton and now occupied by P Tansell as tenant.

    The above suggests that Church House was leased out to Elizabeth Marks, Nora Wilkinson and P Tansell respectively.

    In 1949 'Church House' was occupied by Edith and Winifred Leach.

    Michael Philip Thompson purchased Church House and Cottage in 1968. The Thompson family remained owners of both properties until about 2002.

    The Castle brothers bought both Church House and Church Cottage from the Thompson family and have since kept the properties separate. Richard Castle lived in Church Cottage until moving to Mickleton and the cottage is now rented. His brother Jeremy still lives (2017) in Church House.

    Occupiers

    • Edward Skinner, -1862
    • Elizabeth Skinner, -1880
    • Caleb Skinner, 1880-1906
    • John Cook, 1906-1926
    • Elizabeth Marks, 1926
    • Nora Wilkinson, 1926
    • Ellen Louisa Skinner, 1939
    • Edith and Winifred Leach 1949
    • Alan Layrd Kenneth and June Newman c1964-1968
    • Michael Thompson, 1968-2002
    • Jeremy Castle 2002-

    Cider press cottage: A cruck-framed house that once stood on the corner of Stratford Road Church Street. Its real name, if any, is not known but it once had a cider press. It was demolished in the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 179


    Cider Press Cottage on the left.


    Cider press in 1, Hop Kiln Cottages.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The cruck, just visible in the left-hand photograph, would date this house to before 1600. The name Cider Press Cottage has been added by the editor to help identify the property. The old cider press still survives (2016) and is a garden feature in the front garden of 1 Hop Kiln Cottages, which now stands directly behind and above where the old cottage once stood. The cider press itself was housed in the cider press barn, a timber-framed building which stood behind the old cottage.

    Cleeve View: A semi-detached brick cottage built at the turn of the nineteenth century. 1838 map reference: 107


    Cleeve View, Cress Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Daniel James Griffin, of Cleeve View, was buried in the chuchyard 31st Feby 1909, aged 30 years.

    John James Pugh, of Cleeve View, was buried in the churchyard September fifth 1916, aged 69 years

    In 1949 'Cleeve View' was occupied by Raymond and Christie Cresswell.

    This cottage has been the home of the Cresswell family for many decades. Pat & Diane Cresswell have lived here since 1959. Before them it was the home of Ray (Pat's uncle) & Christie Cresswell. Ray was a Churchwarden and paid for the gates to the new churchyard. Christie, whose maiden name was Beazley, was a teacher at the infant school. In 1939 the Beazleys' were living in Grange Lane.

    Cluna: Name changed to Bramblings.
    Coles Cottages (old): There were two distinct buildings here: two semi-detached thatched cottages and a terrace of four timber-framed thatched cottages as depicted in photograph on the left. They once stood in Village Street opposite to Grange Lane and were demolished in 1947. They were replaced by the present terrace of four dwellings set back from the road as depicted on the right.

    1838 map reference: 230/1

    Coles cottages, old & new, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The old cottages were presumably owned by the Coles family. Muriel Allvey's grandparents lived in one of them for a while. There was a well in one of the gardens and Muriel remembered collecting water and finding frogs in it. The well had no pump and no structure above ground, it was just a hole in the ground.

    1. No.1:
    2. No.2: Home of Jenny Briffet. She was one of the daughters of Arthur Hartiss.
    3. No.3:
    4. No.4: Home of Arthur Hartiss and his two daughters.

    Coles Cottages (new): A terrace of four Council house built on the site of the old tmber-framed cottages in 1947. They were replaced by the present terrace of four dwellings set back from the road and were built by Wheeler & Mansell.

    1838 map reference: 230/1

    Coles cottages, old & new, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The present four houses are numbered one to four starting from the Dalkeith end.

    In 1949 'Coles Cottages' were occupied by:-

    1. no entry
    2. Bertie and Margaret Hartwell. They later moved into Ragley Road.
    3. Ernest and Dorothy Simmonds.
    4. Sidney and Dorothy Bishop.

    Cotswold View: A house built by the Cook family. The date of 1897 is inscribed on the house. Under the Cook family, the house was for many years the village post office. 1838 map reference: 89


    Cotswold View, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    John Cook had the house built in 1897. The deeds suggest that he had already acquired the land by about 1884. There is a story that John Cook built the property from the proceeds of a bet. They were keen collectors of material and stories of the village, especially Steve Cook and his mother. His mother when living at Cotswold View was opposed to the destruction of the allotments where Ragley Road was built.

    A little ditti from Joe Cook of Aylesbury. This is a prelude to a larger book of Joe Cook's memories.


    Introduction to We ‘Nuzzat Cotswold View, some true stories by Joe's, hoped to be published in 2017.

    Old Ruby knows all about delicate matters and often about indelicate matters so when Mother told me not to get old, Old Ruby was the person to consult about this strange instruction, but she does go on a bit and started to tell me that Mother was born in 1888, the year in which her father in law built Cotswold View as a shop and lodging house in the main street of Harvington in the Vale of Evesham. Mother called it a great barn of a place. ln fairness there were lots of bedrooms, a washroom, a playroom, an airing room, two water closets and an outdoor sandbox toilet if things got too desperate for the waiting queue, two coach houses for the horses and their carriages, outhouses for the pigs and poultry, a dozen bee hives a kitchen garden and a greenhouse. A Post Office occupied one of the front rooms so there was always someone there to keep an eye on the ten children and the lodgers.

    Old Ruby said Mother said don’t get old cos you gets hurtful rheumatics and you can’t run no more or even get in and out of the bath cos you’m too weak and you can’t cut your toenails yerself so life don’t seem to be worth the candle but you’m not to worry about that cos you baint no mower than seven years old yunnit and herself was sixty five this Michaelmas. Now that may have been a little fib because everyone knows that Old Ruby must be a hundred at least.

    But this talk of the candle was interesting. I mow about candles. We have the electric at Cotswold View but when I visit Old Ruby we talk by firelight because there is no electric and candles are expensive. She talks funny like saying seaben instead of seven and saying ow bist tha instead of hello. Mother says its because she comes from Saxon stock, those are the invaders who built Harvington church a thousand years ago. You have to show great respect for the church or you go to hell, see. Father goes to church but Mother only goes to the churchyard to confer with her dead friends. Don’t ask.

    We still have to have candles at Cotswold View because the electric often conks out so Betty lights three candles in the big kitchen where we all eat and Father is quite wealthy. I'm not allowed to carry a candle upstairs to bed because I might drop it and burn the house down. When Mother and I visit Grandma Annie at Yew Tree Cottage we walk in the dark with a candle lantern with a long handle because the lantern gets real hot on top and burns your fingers. Grandma Annie lights a single candle so I can make some drawings on the table while they make adult talk but we have to take matches as well to light the going home lantern as matches are expensive too. Mother says I shouldn't be out in the dark on my own anyway but Old Ruby says no matter how dark it is you still have starlight and the moon is often out so you can't get lost.

    Now I am old. You can't imagine how old. Don't ask. I didn't set out to disobey Mother but the years just slipped by somehow. My mate Gunner is gone now and all my other mates too, playing with the angels as they say but I remember the Thirties like yesterday so I've written some of their stories to make you laugh. There are quite a lot of chapters so far. The first chapter is about my mate Gunner, the hero. Where were we? We Wuzzat Cotswold View. Wunt we?


    Zoë Stephens née Cook remembers the shop being in the room on the port side, which probably closed when in the 1950's the shop at Bredon View opened. (Granny) Alice Cook ran the post office in the room on the starboard side next to the large wooden gates from 1929. The gates led to the coach house at the rear.

    In 1949 'Cotswold View' was occupied by Stephen and Joan Cook and his family along with G & W Kendall.

    In the 1950's a family called 'Le Page' lived in rooms at the rear of Cotswold View.

    Bob Maude purchased the house in 1969 and at the time of purchase, he was given a box of deeds that were no longer required legally. He retained them for research purposes. He kindly gave them to me (Julian Rawes) along with a schedule of contents that he had created. I have transcribed the Deeds (2014) and they are now deposited in Worcestershire Record Office.

    DEEDS - The early Deeds have been transcribed here in full and there is much information to be found. The Deeds not only deal with Cotswold View but also with the land on which it stands, including the Hop Pole complex, Spinks Cottage, and also Hawkes Piece on the Alcester Road. Please use this link to peruse a full transcription of the Deeds. Contents.

    Croftland: A built-built house dating from the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 111


    Croftland, taken from a film in 1958.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Croftland was built in 1934 for William John Bromley, the village undertaker. This brick-built house stood in a sizeable plot on Cress Hill. There were also outbuildings for Mr Bromley's undertaking business. The house was unfortunately demolished in the 1990's to make way for three large houses set in Bromley Close. Only the roadside wall and gateway remain.

    For more details on the family of Bromley, see the page on Families.

    In the 1939 census 'Croftland' was occupied by the Bromley family.

    Croft, The: A Victorian brick farmhouse with a modern addition on the side. 1838 map reference: 218


    The Croft, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the early part of the twentieth century this was the home of the Ludlow family.

    In 1939 'The Croft' was occupied by Reginald Ludlow and his family.

    In 1949 'The Croft' was occupied by Reginald Ludlow and Frederick and Irene Mills.

    In 1949 Derek and Audrey Thompson are living in the 'Caravan c/o The Croft'.

    There was a barn that stood behind old and Little Croft on land now owned by Croft Farm.

    Little Croft Cottage: Semi-detached timber framed cottage with bread oven. 1838 map reference: 216


    Little Croft Cottage, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    In the 'Kings England' series of books, Old and New Croft are named Geils Cottages.

    This was once the home of George Savage, churchwarden for many years. This property has changed greatly over recent years with its front timber replaced and bread oven removed.

    In 1949 George Savage and Emily Mickleburgh were living in 'Grange Lane'.

    There was a barn that stood behind old and Little Croft on land now owned by Croft Farm.

    Croft, old: Semi-detached timber framed cottage. 1838 map reference: 216


    Old Croft Cottage, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    In the 'Kings England' series of books, Old and New Croft are named Geils Cottages.

    Crooked Walls: A multiphased thatched house, considered to be one of the oldest in the village. The earlist phase is believed to date from the 15th century, probably as a yeoman's hall. 1838 map reference: 177


    Crooked Walls, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    There is much information that has been gathered about the property so a sub webpage has been created. Please click here for more details on Crooked Walls.

    Cross Cottage: Cross Cottage is sandwiched between Cross House and the Golden Cross. 1838 map reference: 82


    Cross Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Cross Cottage' was occupied by Harry Wicks.

    In 1949 'Cross Cottages' was occupied by Albert & Kathleen Newman and Owen & Nellie Sheward.

    Cross Cottages: Three brick houses dated to 1901. 1838 map reference: 87


    Cross Cottages, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Pax Villa' was the name for the middle dwelling with either side unnamed. George Ashmore inhabits the first nearest Orchard Close. The middle dwelling called 'Pax Villa' is occupied by Ada Jones, Frederick Hancock and a child Michael Beasley, while the last one is occupied by Percival and Laura Wyatt.

    In 1949 'Cross Cottages' are occupied by Michael Beasley and Frederick Hancock; Charles and Ada Jones; Charles and Doris Wallace.

    See Seroule for the property on the right.

    Cross House: A Victorian or Edwardian brick property near the corner of Village Street and the Alcester Road. 1838 map reference: 82


    Cross House, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This was once a shop run by a Mr Scaysbrook. It had been a butchers shop run by Mr Austin. He had served in the Black and Tans.

    Dalkeith: A large three-story Georgian house with outbuildings. The outbuildings are now separate properties and the once sizable garden is much reduced by the building of Walnut Close. 1838 map reference: 233


    Dalkeith, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This may have been the home of the Malin Family in the late 1900's.

    In 1949 'Dalkeith' was occupied by Sidney Stone and family.

    The Hodgkinson Family
    Raymond Hodgkinson and his wife ran Dalkeith as a B&B before WW2. Muriel Taylor, the wife of Walter Allvey used to work for them in the house when she was a teenager. They sold Dalkeith in 1939 and moved to Chester where they ran a Government established farm called Sealands. It had been reclaimed from the sea under a Government scheme to give employment to out of work miners from south Wales. Raymond married in Alcester 9 Apr 1908 to Hilda Grace Bomford, born 18 Feb 1885, died 1980. Raymond died in Hawarden, Cheshire in 1942 aged 59. They had three sons and two daughters.

    1. Raymond Henry (Harry), born 25 Aug 1909. Married 1: 19 Jun 1937 at Hampton to Linda Mary Warner, born 11 Aug 1912, died 30 Mar 1960. Married 2: 1963 Diana M Sly, daughter of Charles Fowler and Isabel Bomford. Raymond died in Cheshire 1969 aged 64.
    2. Sheila, born 1912. Married 1934 William D Yates.
    3. Peter G, born 1914.
    4. Bernard, born 1 Nov 1915, the middle son signed on as apprentice in the Austin Works. According to the Bomford pedigree, he was a major figure in Bomford Brothers and lived at Pitchill. Later, he moved into the middle bungalow in Village Street opposite Langton House. Married 1952 Elizabeth M Eaton. He died c2009.
    5. Gordon D, born 1919.
    6. Patricia M. (Pat), born 13 Sep 1927. Muriel used to look after her as a child. She married ------ Kiege and is still (2014) in contact with Walter Allvey.

    The Stone family
    Sidney Swann, born Gloucester 1881. 1901 living as lodger in Dursley. Bank Cashier in 1911, living Upper Ipsley in Warwickshire, as a Boarder. Later he was a Bank Manager in Alcester. Married Gloucester 1919 Mabel A Holbrook and had issue. Sidney and his wife bought Dalkeith in 1939 from the Hodgkinson family. Sidney died Harvington 1959 aged 78.

    See the page on families for more details of the Stone family.

    Draycott: A bungalow built in the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 7


    Draycott.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Built by the Marsh Family of the Black and White Coach Company. In 1949 it was known as Thornelow and was the home of George and Emily M Purser.

    Dream Cottage: A timber-framed thatched cottage with an apparent cruck at the northern end, although now rendered. The property possibly dating from the fifteen century. 1838 map reference: 227/8


    Dream Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    One of the doorways is thought to date from from before 1600, possibly before 1500. A similar door frame is to be observed at Crooked Walls dated to before the incertion of the chimney stack circa 1600.

    The property was once split into three tenements. The northernmost (1) was for a while occupied by the Timms family. The middle one (2) was occupied by the Taylor family for a while (see Well Cottage). During the last fifty years, It was converted into one house by two men who purchased the property in the early 1960's. Presumably at that time acquired the name 'Dream'. The property appears to be in a fairly original state, it has recently (2015) had a new thatch and three chimney stacks.

    In 1939 'The Old Cottage, Main Street is occupied by Albert and Dorothy Timms.

    In 1949 it is believed that 'Thatched Cottages, Main Street' are the present Dream Cottage. Percy and Joan Knight were living in part of the property and Albert and Dorothy Timms still occupy No. 1.

    The whole property was bought by a man from Birmingham early in the 1960's, did it up and sold it to a Mr. Owen. Mrs Timms continued to live in the first part of it for some time.

    Dream Cottage has been owned by the present (2016) lady for about 25 years.

    Etoile: A bungalow set back from the road. 1838 map reference: 63


    Draycott.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Unoccupied in 1949.

    Evesham Road Council Houses: Three blocks of semi-detached houses built in the 1930's.

    1838 map reference: 31


    Evesham Road Council Houses.

    History of the properties so far gathered.

    The numbering of the houses is from the Cross.

    Evesham Road CH: - number one paired with number two

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 number 1 was occupied by Edgar Cresswell and Doris Dipper. Edgar was living here in 1939.

    Evesham Road CH: - number two paired with number one

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 number 2 was occupied by Frank and Dorothy Gostlow and Melicent Knight.

    Evesham Road CH: - number three paired with number four

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 number 3 was occupied by Reginald and Rosamond Fleetwood.

    Evesham Road CH: - number four paired with number three

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 number 4 was occupied by Joseph and Barbara Bailey. They were living here in 1939.

    Evesham Road CH: - number five paired with number six

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 number 6 is incorrectly named as number six Alcester Road and is occupied by Margaret Addis. Margaret was living here in 1939.

    Evesham Road CH: - number six paired with number five

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 number 6 is incorrectly named as number six Alcester Road and is occupied by George and Margaret Brookes. They were living here in 1939.

    Fairview Cottages: Semi-detached Victorian brick cottages, these were probably originally a terrace of four cottages. 1838 map reference: 86


    Fairview Cottages, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 Felix, Mary and Jane Anderson along with Mary Oliver were probably living at 3 Fairview Cottages in Alcester Road.

    In 1949 '1 Fairview Cottages' was occupied by Charles and Florence Ward.

    In 1949 '2 Fairview Cottages' was occupied by Percy and Alice Tansell. In 1939 they lived in either Candle Cottage or Church House.

    Ferndale: Semi-detached Victorian brick house, possibly separated from Sunnybank in the 1920's. 1838 map reference: 7


    Ferndale, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Walter and Gertrude Bywater lived here in the 1920's. Mrs Bywater did a lot of work in the village. In 1949 'Ferndale' was still occupied by Walter and Gertrude. Walter ran a building business.

    The builders yard then became a garage repair shop under Eric Blake, who died c2013 aged 75. Mr John Walsh carried on the business and recently retired (2014).

    Finch Hay Cottage: A timber-framed cottage. 1838 map reference: 206


    Finch Hay Cottage, Finch Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The property is thought to date from at least the 17th century, along with its neighbour Rose Cottage and also a long-gone cottage depicted on the map of 1838. The name Finch Hay is recorded in the Deeds in 1946 as the name of the cottage. At the time the present Finch Lane had a number of names applied to it such as 'Rectory Lane' and 'Skinner Lane'. The earliest documents refer to the passing away of members of the Malin Family. The Malin's owned and occupied the nearby Bank House and it is clear that Finch Hay and the surrounding land once belonged to Bank House. The documents record that Amelia Maud Malin, spinster, died in 1940 and that Walter Malin, Company Director was her Executor. Finch Hay was part of the Bank House Estate from at least 1870, this can be gleamed from the Bank House Deeds.

    It is also noted in the two documents dated 1946 that the Walker Family occupied Finch Hay and part of its land, while the Skinner Family rented an adjacent area of land now occupied by houses. The Skinner Family owned Church House, Cottage and Candle Cottage and their details can be found under those properties. The Walker Family purchased Finch Hay and its surrounding land from Walter Malin in 1946. The Walker's had lived in Finch Hay as tenants from at least 1939.

    In the 1939 Census 'Finchay' was occupied by Leslie and Clarice Walker.

    In the 1949 Electoral Roll 'Finch Hay' was occupied by Leslie and Annie Walker.

    A Land Charges document of 31st July 1956 lists a number of people invovled in Finch Hay and its land:-

    1. William Alfred Malin, of Broad View, Benge Hill, Evesham.
    2. Nancy Edith Malin, ditto
    3. Leonard Charles Malin, of Evesham
    4. Walter Malin, of Harvington, Company Director
    5. Rosa Malin, of Harvington
    6. Amelia Maud Malin, of Harvington
    7. Raymond Edgar Walker, of Finch Hay

    On 1st October 1949 Raymond Edgar Walker, of Finch Hay, Market Gardener, made his Will and appointed his wife Annie Walker to be his sole Exectrix, he died on 5th January 1958. A mortgage document dated 11th August 1956, states that Annie Walker took out a mortgage to purchase Finch Hay from the Malin Family.

    In a Land Charges document of 1964, Annie is still the occupier along with her daughter Clarice Mary Walker. On 13th April 1972 Annie Walker died and in her Will she left her estate to her children Leslie James Walker and Clarice Mary Walker.

    On 23rd July 1979 the Walker's sold two plots of land separated by a footpath: one to Rose Cottage Developments Ltd, of Pershore; the other to L W Locke, Builders Ltd. In the 1979 document there is a reference to an interesting 'schedule' referencing an earlier document which possibly survives in the Deeds of Bank House.

    • 15th May 1915 Conveyance - Arthur Rogers Winnington Ingram (1), Rosa Malin (2).
    • 18th March 1946 Assent - Walter Malin
    • 6th August 1952 Assent - William Alfred Tomkins, Nancy Edith Tomkins and Leonard Charles Fox to Raymond Edgar Walker.
    • 11th August 1956 Mortgage - Raymond Edgar Walker (1), The Vale of Evesham Permanent Building Society (2). With receipt endorsed dated 13th October 1969.
    • 27th February 1958 - Probate of the Will of Raymond Edgar Walker.
    • 20th July 1959 Assent - Annie Walker (1), The Vale of Evesham Permanent Building Society (2).
    • 21st May 1964 Further Charge - Annie Walker (1), Clarice Mary Walker (2), The Cheltenham & Gloucester Building Society (3). With receipt endorsed dated 13th October 1969.
    • 14th June 1972 Probate of the Will of Annie Walker.
    • 24th March 1973 Assent - by the Vendors.

    By 1989 Norman John Hodgetts of 16 Queens Road, Evesham, Solicitor, was the personal representative of Leslie James Walker and his sole Executor. Leslie James Walker died in 1989 and his sole beneficiary was his sister Clarice.

    On 29th July 1889 Clarice Walker sold a square plot of land behind the garden of the neighbouring Rose Cottage to Graham Collingwood Underhill of Moseley in Birmingham. This plot is now part of the garden of Rose Cottage, which is still (2019) owned by Mr Underhill.

    Clarice Walker, of Finch Hay, died 6th February 1995, her executors being Norman John Hodgetts, Solicitor, and Julie Ann Pratt, both of De Montfort House, 115 High Street, Evesham.

    Konrad and Wendy Monks bought the cottage in 1995 and still reside there in 2018.

    Walker Family
    Raymond Edgar Walker, was born Sheriffs Lench 1883. He married Annie Need in 1909. She was born Great Hampton 23 April 1887. In the 1911 Census Raymond and his wife are living in the Shakespeare Inn. He died 5th January 1958 aged 74. She died 13th January 1972. They had issue:-

    1. Leslie James, born 1912. Died 1989.
    2. Clarice Mary, born 1924. Died 6th February 1995.

    The Walker's rented land on the further side of the present cricket ground where they ploughed the land with a horse. On the land was a large old timber barn with two sets of double doors on either side so that you could drive a tractor through. There was a well to the rear and right of the building. The land belonged to the Council and after the Walker's John Shailer was the tenant after whom Roger Haines took over. There is no sign of the barn in 2018.


    PROPERTY DEEDS
    The Property
    Deeds The present (2018) owners, Konrad and Wendy Monks, kindly allowed the old Deeds of their property to be reproduced on this site.

    Firbank (Fairbank): Traditional timbered and partly thatched farmhouse set upon a high bank. 1838 map reference: 189


    Firbank, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    A long time ago, it was a pub called White Horse. The first mention of 'Firbank' as a name is in a letter from Samuel Towers in 1907.

    Meads & Husbands
    Amelia Mead, owned Firbank in 1843. She married Edmund Thomas Husbands at Cheltenham in 1843. They "did grant bargain sell & release unto" Frederick William Hohler & Wm Hill to hold upon trust. Rev Hohler and William Hill then leased the property to John Ingram and Benjamin Bomford. At this time Firbank possessed 63 acreas. Samuel Wood Fisher was also involved in this rather complicated ownership of Firbank.

    Edmund and Amelia had Robert Evans Meads Husbands, Edmund Thomas Tibbetts Husbands & John Frederick Husband. Amelia died on 19th Janry 1858. Rev Hohler, died on the 17th July 1871. Samuel Fisher, died on 23rd January 1882. William Hill, died in 1882 and left his interest in Firbank to his son William Slack Hill. Edmund Husbands, died on 4th February 1902, which presumably precipitated the selling on Firbank. The Equitable Reversionary Interest Society Ltd, 10 Lancaster Place Strand, London was also an interested party. The property was put up for sale in 1902.

    On 21st July 1902 Benjamin Bomford bought 40 acreas leaving 12 out of the original 63 acreas to go with the property. Mr Adams bought it with 10 acreas.

    Adams Family
    In 1902 William Hurd Adams, Farmer of Hill View, Badsey, bought Firbank along with 10 acres of land for £1010. In 1904 he had a major restorion done on Firbank by William Davis, Builder. In 1904, while his property was being renovated or built, he was living at The Cottage, Swan Lane, Evesham. In 1904 Mr Adams leased a strip on land for a fowl run to George Ellis Garrard, Solicitor, who sublet it to Thomas Driver. From 1906 onwards Samuel Towers and his family were renting Firbank so it is assumed that by that time Mr Adams and his family were living in their newly built house called 'The Orchard', situated to the south and west and within the 10 acres that Mr Adams had purchased in 1902. William Hurd Adams, Fruit Grower, died on 6th March 1916. His Will included two executors, Frederick Haines, of Evesham, Fruit Grower and James Gill, of Norton & Lenchwick, Farmer. He left his estate of Firbank to Winifred Mason, the wife of Herbert John Mason, of 12 & 14 Bath Row in the City of Birmingham, Manufacturer. Firbank was put up for auction on 15th May 1916 in two lots as depicted on the plan; Lot 1, with most of the land including The Orchard; Lot 2, was Firbank and its garden. On 16th May 1916, Herbert Mason of Edgbaston in Birmingham bought Lot 2, for £260 and Ernest William Bunting of Norton and Lenchwick, Gentleman bought Lot 1, for £2325 on 16th May 1916. When the properties were divided some accomodation had to be arranged for the access road to Lot 1, which at that time ran past Firbank. From hereon the stories of Firbank and The Orchard divide. There are sale particulars within the Deeds for the auction in 1916.

    As stated above, Winifred and Herbert Mason, bought Firbank on 16th May 1916, but they never lived there as from 1906 it was the home of the Towers family. It is not known when they sold it.

    Towers Family
    The Towers family moved into Firbank as tenants in 1906 and lived in the house until shortly after the death of Samuel Towers on 30th June 1943. It is not clear at present from when, if ever, the Towers family bought Firbank. For more information on the Towers Family, go to the page on Families.

    In 1939 'Firbank' was occupied by Samuel and Edith Towers.

    In 1949 'Ferbank' was occupied by Charles and Alice Taylor.

    In the 1950's Mrs Horrocks owned the property.

    In 1959 Mr and Mrs Tooley sold Firbank to Mr and Mrs Barr.

    Barr Family
    The Barr Family from Uxbridge purchased it circa 1959. Charles D Barr had married Sylvia Modero in Uxbridge in 1949. Charles was a headmaster at Blackminster and his wife Sylvia taught at Redditch Co. High School. Sylvia was a keen historian and collected material on the village, including Steve Cook etc. She also helped Marjorie Bailey on her researches into Harvington's history. Some of her material was given to someone in the village and is now considered lost. Ann, the daughter of Charles and Sylvia, was brought up at Firbank and later married Cyril Westcott, they now (2016) live at Ye Olde Cottage. Charles and Sylvia moved out of the village in 1979 when the house and garden was becoming too much for them.

    The Barr's sold it to Bob Hepple. He ran a car sales business from the Four Chevrons Garage on the Alcester Road. He took over from Mr Wagstaff.

    Property type from the Internet: detached, freehold.

    Firbank changed hands on 12th Sep 2003.


    PROPERTY DEEDS
    The Property
    Deeds these are only part of the deeds retained by Mrs Barr, who sold the property in 1979. The material ranges from 1902 to 1924, with reference to previous documents.

    Four Chevrons: A semi-detached rendered house on the Alcester Road. 1838 map reference: 84


    Four Chevrons, Alcester Road.
    The site of the garage is to the left.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1939 census 'Four Chevrons Garage' was occupied by Frederick and Margaret Richards.

    Geils Cottages: Name changed to Old and New Croft. 1838 map reference: 216
    Glebe Cottages (old): A row of four timber-framed and thatched cottages in Village Street along with a barn at the end. They were demolished in the 1930's to make way for the present Council houses. 1838 map reference: 233


    Old Glebe Cottages, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The only possible reference so far found connected to these cottages is in the Deeds of Cedar Lodge. The reference here probably refers to Glebe Cottages. "Thirdly all those three cottages or tenements with the garden and premises thereto adjoining and belonging and situated at Harvington aforesaid as then in the occupation of Mr William Davis and his under tenants under a lease thereof for 7 years granted by indenture dated the 20th September 1879".

    Glebe Cottages (new): A row of 12 semi-detached council houses in 6 blocks built circa 1936. 1838 map reference: 233


    New Glebe Cottages, Village Street.

    They were built by the Council after the demolition of the old glebe cottages and are numbered from Hughes Lane to Grange Lane. Please see below for information about families who inhabited them.

    Glebe Cottages: - number one paired with number two

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 1 was occupied by James and Lucy Baylis.

    In 1949 '1 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by James and Lucy Baylis and William Langstone.

    Glebe Cottages: - number two paired with number one

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 2 was occupied by Sidney and Eileen Cresswell.

    In 1949 '2 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by Sidney and Irene Cresswell.

    This (2017) the home of Gerry and Ann Millard.

    Glebe Cottages: - number three paired with number four

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 03 was occupied by Mary Hughes.

    In 1949 'Council Houses, 3' was occupied by Walter and Mary Hughes.

    From 1968 to 2005/6 Alan and June Newman lived here.

    Glebe Cottages: - number four paired with number three

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 4 was occupied by Ernest Ward.

    In 1949 '4 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by Ernest Ward and Katherine Schuy.

    Glebe Cottages: - number five paired with number six

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 5 was occupied by Martha Cresswell.

    In 1949 '5 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by John and Kathleen Foley.

    Glebe Cottages: - number six paired with number five

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 6 was occupied by Martha Clark.

    In 1949 'Council Houses, 6' was occupied by Charles William Joyner.

    Glebe Cottages: - number seven paired with number eight

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 7 was occupied by Alice Joyner.

    In 1949 'Council Houses, 7' was occupied by Frederick and Alice Joyner.

    Glebe Cottages: - number eight paired with number seven

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 8 was occupied by Edwin and Sarah Autie.

    In 1949 '8 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by Thomas Johnson.

    Glebe Cottages: - number nine paired with number ten

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 9 was occupied by George and Agnes Brookes.

    In 1949 '9 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by John and Beatrice Ward.

    Glebe Cottages: - number ten paired with number nine

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 and 1949 number 10 was occupied by Leslie (Lez) and Sarah Newman.

    In 1949 10 Glebe Cottages is not mentioned.

    Glebe Cottages: - number eleven paired with number twelve

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 11 was occupied by Alice and Ruby Knight.

    In 1949 '11 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by Alfred and Ruby Knight.

    Glebe Cottages: - number twelve paired with number eleven

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 12 was occupied by Frederick and Edith Holder. They had issue:-

    1. Edith, married Ralph Hammond and lived at Cherry Hill Farm, Marcliff. After Ralph had died Edith returned to Harvington to live with her mother. Ralph and Edith had issue:-
      1. Linda, she lived at No.12 Glebe Cottages until she died.

    In 1949 '12 Glebe Cottages' was occupied by Edith Holder, daughter of Charles Newman.

    Glenavon: An early twentieth century house in Station Road next to the old police station. 1838 map reference: 108


    Glenavon, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1939 census the 'Glenavon' was occupied by Reginald Prudden and his wife Nancy née Ludlow.

    In 1949 'Glenavon' was occupied by Derek and Florence Prudden.

    Golden Cross: A late eighteenth or early nineteenth century brick house. In times past it has been extended both to the side and front. 1838 map reference: 82


    Golden Cross, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    There is much more detail to come in due course but to start with, it was originally a farm house. Samuel Coley was the Innkeeper during WW1 and profited by the Defence of the Realm Act (Dora). There was a munitions factory at Redditch and owing to drunkenness, an Act was passed banning the sale of alcohol within 25 miles of the factory. The Golden Cross was just outside the limit so thereby profited from visitors from the north. Like the Shakespeare, it was originally owned by the Flowers company.

    In the 1939 census 'Golden Cross' was occupied by Harold and Annie Aston.

    In 1949 'The Golden Cross' was occupied by John, Harold and Annie Aston.

    Grange Cottages: Three timber framed cottages that once stood in Grange Lane. 1838 map reference: 215


    Grange Cottages, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Three cottages that once stood in Grange Lane in front of where there is the 'Bramblings' and 'Birch House'. At present very little is known of these cottages. One can see from the above photograph, dated to 1910, that the first two are timber framed and probably date to the 17th century. The further however is either rendered or is of stone and appears to be larger and perhaps older. Beyond are the gates to the 'Grange' and the 'Barn'.

    They were demolished by Ken Wheeler of Langton House in 1953 to make way for Birch House, where his eldest son lived, and later the Bramblings, built for Miss Morrow, niece to Mr Bomford of the Grange.

    Grange Cottages: Two semi-detached red brick cottages. 1838 map reference: 209


    Grange Cottages, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The cottages were numbered 28 & 29 Grange Lane as part of the cottages belonging to the Grange.

    In 1949 Kenneth and Ivy Walden lived at '28 Grange Cottages'. They were not in the village in 1939.

    Greengates: A Victorian double fronted house. 1838 map reference: 84


    Greengates, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 'Green Gates' was occupied by Frederick and Florence Sherwood. Frederick was a Master Baker and in 1939 lived with his wife at the Bakery on the corner of Stratford Road and Village Street.

    Green Street Farm: A brick-built cottage on Blue Lias stone, now greatly extended, with outbuildings. 1838 map reference: 99

    Green Street Farm, Green Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The property probably dates from the nineteenth century and was owned by the Church until 2014. This area was Glebe land in the 1840's. One of the Byrd family has purchased it. The surrounding land is still owned by the Church and is rented by the Byrds.

    In 1939 'Green Street' was occupied by Charles and Christiana Mason.

    In 1949 'Green Street Farm' was occupied by Mary and Harold Clarke and Arthur Rickett.

    Greycoat: A house built in the 1950's. 1838 map reference: 99

    Greycoat, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This was the home of Steve Cook and his family. For his family see under 'Families'.

    Grove Lodge: Victorian house built of brick in 1880, There is a date plaque on the front. 1838 map reference: 185


    Grove Lodge, Station Bank.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Possibly named after Miss Kate Grove who lived in the house in 1911.

    In the 1939 census 'Grove Lodge' was occupied by Amy, Catherine, Ada and Florence Grove. The family was still living there in 1949.

    The house has been the home of the Bailey family for many years. See the History of Harvington by Marjorie Bailey for details of the Bailey family.

    Grove Cottages: The terrace of four brick cottages was built in 1876. 1838 map reference: 186


    Grove Cottages, Station Bank.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1939 census 'Grove Cottages' were occupied by Arthur and Eleanor Jones, Frank and Mary Taylor, Blanche Fife.

    In 1949:
    'The Grove 4' was occupied by Florence Page. 'The Grove, Station Bank' was occupied by Arthur Jones. 'The Grove, Station Road' was occupied by Blanche Fife. 'The Grove, Station Road 1' was occupied by Edith Towers.

    Number one:

    Number two:
    A family called Gisborne lived here in 1911.

    Arthur Gisborne married Harriet and had issue:-

    1. Leonard, his granddaughter is Sarah Clear.

    Number three:

    Number four:

    Gwynear, Station Road: A bungalow built before WW2. 1838 map reference: 99


    Gwynear, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Built by Ralph Cole circa 1920 who lived there with his wife Gertrude for many years. He sold it to Reg Johnson who has only recently (2016) died. Some years ago he tragically lost his wife, his son (who died on his way to his mother's funeral) and their pet dog within a short space of time.

    In 1939 'Gwynear' was occupied by Ralph COle.

    In 1949 'Gwynear' was occupied by Ralph and Gertrude Cole.

    Harvington Hill: An old part brick, part timber cottage in the grounds of Harvington Lodge. 1838 map reference: 23


    Harvington Hill in the grounds of Harvington Lodge, Alcester Road

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The small old two-story brick house still stands albeit in a dilapidated condition. It apparently has virtually no foundations and is now condemmed. In the records it is to be found under a Harvington Hill Cottage, Lodge Fields or Game Keeper's Cottage, George Marshall, who worked at the Lodge under the Bomford's, knew it as keeper's Cottage.

    In 1881 a family called Palmer is assumed to have lived here, possibly as caretakers to the Lodge.

    In 1939 'The Hill' was occupied by Edith Moulden, while Ernest Moulden lived at 'Lodge Fields', which suggests that it was called Lodge Fields.

    Sometime after WW2, Walter Lockey was the Game Keeper to the Bomford's with his wife, there was no electricity. They lived there with their four children:-

    1. Michael (Mike)
    2. Anne
    3. Martin
    4. Ruth

    In 1949 'Harvington Hill Cottage' was still occupied by Walter and Marjorie Lockey.

    Harvington Lodge: The present estate house is thought to date from the eighteenth century. It is still a working farm and there are a number of buildings both old and modern in its ground. 1838 map reference: 23

    Harvington Lodge, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The property, like all of Harvington, was owned by the Church at Worcester. It is not clear whether the Marshall family owned or rented the estate. Following, is a history of the Marshall family. In 1807, the Marshalls are described as 'of the Hill'. The name 'Lodge' goes back to at least 1881. The Marshalls lived at the Lodge until about the middle of the ninteenth century.

    Thomas Gould Marshall married at St Martin’s, Birmingham, 23 May 1815 Harriet Prickett. He was buried Harvington 1856.

    Documents held at Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive: DR316/32-33 3 & 4 August 1818 - contents:-
    Lease and release, the release being:
    i) a conveyance from Thomas Gould Marshall of Harvington, co. Worcs., (eldest son and heir of Wilson Marshall, late of the same, gentleman), at the request of John Lord, gentleman, William Chattaway, draper, and William Hemings, surveyor, all of Stratford-upon-Avon (assignees of the estate and effects of Robert Hobbes late of the same, a bankrupt), with the consent of Francis Homfray, clerk, George Baylis, John Marshall the elder, John Marshall the younger and John Heywood (executors of the will and codicil of Wilson Marshall), to Edmund Chambers, late of Binton, but now of Milcote, farmer, and his trustee, Robert Fisher of Long Marston, gentleman, (reciting DR316/16-17, 19-20, 28-30) for £250 paid to the executors of Wilson Marshall in discharge of the recited mortgage (DR316/16-17), of the freehold messuage described in DR316/16-17, now in the tenure of Thomas Sanders, lace-manufacturer;
    ii) a conveyance from John Lord, William Chattaway, and William Hemings to Edmund Chambers, for £1040 owing to him under the recited mortgage of 1 May 1810 (DR316/28), of a piece of ground on which a messuage and cottages once stood, but which had been taken down and school buildings erected in their place, and which are also now in the tenure of the said Thomas Sanders;
    iii) an assignment from the executors of Wilson Marshall, with the consent of the assignees of Robert Hobbes, to Edmund Chambers, of the residue of a term of 1000 years in a piece of leasehold ground in Ely Street as described in DR316/28.

    Documents held at Museum of English Rural Life: Agreement TR BOM/SP4/3 1849(28 Apr) - contents:-
    Party 1: Thomas Gould Marshall of Harvington Lodge, Worcestershire, gentleman
    Party 2: Benjamin Bomford, late of Wixford, Worcestershire, now of Pitchill, Warwickshire, gentleman.
    Of sale to Party 2 of the Harvington Lodge Estate, Worcestershire, for £9,000 , payable as £100 on signing of this agreement and £8,900 on 1849(29 Sep). The estate is in 26 parts which are listed in the schedule, including arable, pasture, wood and buildings, and comprising 172 acres and 10 perches. The land is divided into freehold, and copyhold, the latter held of the Dean and Chapter of Worcester, Lords of the Manor of Harvington, by two sets of copies of Court Roll, 1849(28 Jun). Party 1 will deliver an abstract of title to Party 2 within six weeks and also do all necessary for the conveyance of the estate to Party 2 on 1849(29 Sep), provided the remainder of the purchase price will have been paid. The copyhold tenants are listed with their ages, their annual rent, amounting to £2-15-Od. Party 1 has also agreed to loan Party 2 £4,000 during Party 1's life, as part of the purchase price of the estate and at an annual interest of 4% commencing 1849(29 Apr), the interest payable therefrom at half yearly intervals, deducting only property and income tax. The loan is to be secured by a mortgage of the estate by Party 2, subject to other prior mortgages and a covenant by Party 1, that the loan will stand for his lifetime, provided the 4% interest be paid at half yearly intervals. The cost of preparing the abstract of title, the conveyances, mortgage and covenant to be borne by Party 2, but the cost of surrenders of the copyhold premises by Party 1. Party 2 is also to take the turnip crop growing on the estate as at 1849(29 Sep) at a valuation made at the joint expense of both parties, the amount of which is payable straight away by Party 2 to Party 1.

    School
    The Lodge was apparently a school when the Bomford's purchased it in the early 1890's.

    The Bomford family
    Benjamin Bomford was born on 12 Oct 1857 at White House and died 18 Mar 1929 at Harvington Lodge. He married Gertrude Brewer Kendrick, born 24 Sep 1856 at Birmingham and died 21 Mar 1929 at the Lodge, at Kings Norton in 1885. Benjamin and Gertrude took up residence at the Lodge in the early 1890's. Their son Harold Kendrick Bomford, known as Ken, was born 16 Apr 1899 at Harvington Lodge and also lived at the Lodge until his death on 18 Nov 1958. He had married Lilias Heath in 1948 who continued to live at the Lodge until she died in the late 70's or early 80's. The estate then passed to her brothers Frank and David Heath, then put up for action and was purchased by the Johnson family. There is a fine and lengthy history of the Bomfords by Dr Bruce Bomford FRCS. Here is a link to his history. The Bomfords of Worcestershire. For the family line see Bomford Pedigree

    The Johnson Family
    Harvington Lodge is still (2015) owned by the Johnson family.


    In the 1939 census 'Harvington Lodge' was occupied by Harold Bomford.

    Hawkes Piece: A plot of land on the Alcester Road, now covered by a small estate called 'Hawkes Piece' and a property called Teasel Cottage. 1838 map reference: 94


    Hawkes Piece, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This plot of land was called 'Hawkes Piece' from at least 1850 and is possibly named after William Hawkes Marshall (see under Harvington Lodge). It is also mentioned in the Deeds to Cotswold View. Bert Buttler, a builder, and his wife bought the land and in 1961 erected a house which they called 'Shirlholme'. Bert's wife Elsie is remembered for selling vegetables grown on the land behind. See under Shirlholme for their family.

    In 1990 part of the land was sold and 'Teasel Cottage' was erected. In 2006 Shirlholme, along with the remaining land, was sold by auction, the house was demolished and a new development called 'Hawkes Piece' now stands on the site.

    Hill Farm: A ruined stone-built farmhouse. 1838 map reference: 15/6

    Hill Farm, Harvington Hill, notice the old window frame on the right,
    a sad reminder of what can happen to a once lovely home.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Hill Farm is also known as 'The Hill' and can be confused with the cottage (Harvington Hill) near to Harvington Lodge.

    The track leading up to this old building is or was known locally was 'Barrow', and the field to the west is also known by that name. The name suggests that a prehistoric barrow or tumuli once existed here. No remains of this feature now remain but it is likely to have been near to the old house.

    The present ruin is clearly very old and was constructed, at least in part, of the local Blue Lias stone. Orchards once surrounded the house but the ruin now presents a bleak and lonely aspect of dereliction and windswept ploughed fields. George and Doreen Marshall of the Brickyard, remember it as a fine and spacious house with adjacent farm buildings, gardens and orchards. The little extension to the right of it depicted in the old photograph was a brick-built wash house behind which was a well.

    The construction of a bungalow was commenced to the rear of the house but apparently owing to lack of planning it was never completed and is now left with walls rising out of the brambles. There is also no sign of the rear part of the house visible in the old photograph.

    In the earlier part of the 20th century this was the home of Hemming Clarke and his family, Farm Bayliffe to the Bomfords and there is a fine photograph of Hemming Clarke (see under Families), sitting upon his horse outside the house.

    In the 1901 Census, Hemming Clarke of Harvington Lodge (sic), was living with his wife Mary and children all born in Church Lench.

    1. Leonard, aged 15.
    2. Dora, aged 12.
    3. Ellen, aged 10.
    4. Edith, aged 8.
    5. Gladys Ethel, aged 4. Living at 'The Hill' when she died of T.B. in 1910.
    Dora Clarke, was living at 'The Hill' when she died of TB in 1910. In the 1911 Census Hemming Clark, born Church Lench, aged 57 and Farm Bayliffe was living here with wife Mary, born Church Lench, aged 59, and daughter Gladys Ethel, born Atch Lench, aged 14. They had been married 34 years.

    William (Bill) and Edith Moulden lived in the old house after WW2. Bill Moulden had suffered as a Japanese prisoner of war and probably as a result he became a recluse and would not let anyone into his home. Bill was a Japonese prisoner of War and was forced to work at a salt mine and a train or cart ran over his leg. Old Mrs Moulden was seen around the village almost doubled up with a back problem. When she died and the house became delapidated Bill moved into a caravan nearby, see under 'The Caravan'.

    See Harvington Hill with which it can be confused.

    Moulden Family
    Ernest Moulden, born Mappleboro Green, Warcs 25th Nov 1872. a widower, a groom, living in 'Bomford's Cottage, Harvington. He married Lucy Jane, She died in 1908 aged 30. They had issue:-

    1. Edith Hilda, born 19th Feb 1899.
    2. William (Bill) Richard, born Grafton, Warcs. 1905. Aged 5 in 1911. He was married in 1932 to Edith Clarke. They lived at The Hill and had one child who died in infancy.
    3. Jessie, born Grafton, Warcs. 1906. Aged 4 in 1911.
    4. Harold Leslie, born at Harvington Hill 18th Aug 1908. Aged 2 in 1911. Harold's wife Annie M Smith, was born 1st Oct 1905. She was sister to Rose who married a Reynolds. They lived in number 3, Brickyard Cottages.


      Harold Moulden on the left and Frank (Tom) Newman on the right
      at No.9, The Brickyard c1950.

      Harold and Annie had issue:-

      1. Kathleen S, born 1935. She was married in 1954 to Frederick L Baldwin. They firstly lived in a thatched cottage in Abbots Salford. They then moved, after the death of her parents, into number 3, Brickyard Cottages. They passed away circa 2016.
    Holmleigh: Brick-built house built in the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 7


    Holmleigh.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Built by the Marsh Family of the Black and White Coach Company.

    In 1939 it is occupied by: Walter R Warrington, born 6th June 1866, retired farmer and Jecolia A Warrington, born 26th Feb 1868.

    In 1949 it is occupied by: Michael E and Brenda C Marsh.

    Cath Davies and her husband have lived here since 1984 until the present (2018).

    Hop Kiln Cottages: Eight council houses in four pairs built in the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 176


    Hop Kiln Cottages, Numbers 1 and 2
    with the old forge in front.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    They were built by the Council in the 1930's on land bought from the Bomford Estate. They are numbered from Crooked Walls to Shakespeare Lane. Please see below for information about the families who inhabited them.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number one paired with number two

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 1 does not appear to be inhabited.

    In 1949 1 Hop Kiln was occupied by Arthur Clara and Mabel Hartiss.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number two paired with number one

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 2 was occupied by George and Emily Grimmett. Below and to the side of number two is the old smithy run by George Grimmett.

    In 1949 '2 Hop Kiln' was occupied by George and Emily Grimmitt.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number three paired with number four

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 3 was occupied by Herman and Edith Hall.

    In 1949 '3 Hop Kiln' was occupied by Hermonn, Edith, Reginald Hall and Harry Sylvia Grey.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number four paired with number three

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 4 was occupied by Edward and Edith Cresswell.

    In 1949 '4 Hop Kiln' was occupied by Edward and Edith Cresswell.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number five paired with number six

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 5 was occupied by Sidney and Nellie Ashmead.

    In 1949 '5 Hop Kiln' was occupied by Sidney Ashmead and Rose Watkins.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number six paired with number five

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 6 was occupied by Frederick and Ellen Smith.

    In 1949 '6 Hop Kiln' was occupied by Frederick and Helen Smith.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number seven paired with number eight

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 7 was occupied by William and Margaret Shailer.

    In 1949 '7 Shakespeare Lane' was occupied by William and Margaret Shailer.

    Hop Kiln Cottages: - number eight paired with number seven

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 8 was occupied by Ernest and Doris Parriss.

    In 1949 '8 Shakespeare Lane' was occupied by Ernest and Doris Parriss.

    Hop Pole House and Cottage: The Hope Pole Inn, as it once was, still exists as Hop Pole House & Cottage. It had ceased to be an inn by February 1850. 1838 map reference: 90


    Hop Pole House and Hop Pole Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Hop Pole Inn is the L-shaped late eighteenth century building now divided into two properties called Hop Pole House and Hop Pole Cottage. It stands on the junction of Village Street and the lane called Green Street. As stated above, the Hop Pole had ceased to be an Inn by 1850 and at that time was in the process of being converted, probably into two tenements. At the same time the little building on the corner appears to have been converted into a house.

    The 1838 estate map also indicates a building, probably a barn, on the western side of the Hop Pole. This building may have been demolished as it does not seem to appear on early photographs. There is now a modern house on the site called Damasaro. Note that on the map the buildings either side are in grey thereby indicating that they were not dwellings.

    Note the little pink building further along Village Street. This was the little thatched cottage whose last occupant was Mr Spinks. It was demolished in 1919.

    According to the Deeds of Cotswold View, in a document dated 1858, the Hop Pole complex was made up of four tenements and "were now in or late occupation of James Tarrent, Edward Davis, John Hughes and [blank] as tenants". Later they were occupied by Edward Gould, Edward Davis and John Bennett.

    In the mid-twentieth century the Hop Pole complex was owned by the Fowler family, hardware merchants. They had a Ford model-T convertible. During the week they sold paraffin etc. with it and on the weekends and holidays it doubled up as a charabanc and took villagers on day trips. In 1939 Arthur W and Emma M Fowler were living here. Elizabeth A Fowler, their daughter was born in 1917, married Kurt A Ebel at Harvington in 1948.

    In 1939 Hannah Young and Elizabeth Pitman were living here as ditto to the house occupants but probably in the Cottage.

    In 1949 'Hop Pole House' was occupied by Arthur Fowler and Elizabeth Ebel. 'Hop Pole Cottage' was occupied by Ivy Cowley, Eric Gorin and Hannah Young.

    Horse Shoe Cottage: A semi-detached cottage, rebuilt in 1912. It may incorporate an earlier building on the same site, as indicated by an 1838 map. Its semi-detached partner is Mona Cottage. At one time a bedroom of Horse Shoe Cottage was part of Mona to allow more space for the Hughes family. 1838 map reference: 222


    Horse Shoe Cottage, Hughes Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Mona Cottage' was occupied by William and Lilian Bromley.

    The cottage, along with Mona, was owned by Lilian Mansell. Jean Spires and her husband lived in the cottage. Beforehand, it was rented out to Francis and Ethel Harris.

    In 1949 'Horse Shoe Cottage' was occupied by Francis and Ethel Harris.

    Ivy Cottage: See number 10, Brickyard Cottages. 1838 map reference: 1
    Ivy Bank: A brick-built cottage on Station Bank. 1838 map reference: 185

    Ivy Bank, Station Bank.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1939 census 'Ivy Bank' was occupied by Mary Greenway, Kate Harley and Kathleen Osborn.

    In 1949 'Ivybank' was occupied by Evelyn Tonks.

    It has been the home of Denis and Cathy May for many years (2015). Cathy died in 2016 and Denis moved to a nursing home in Shropshire.

    Ivy Dene Cottage: A brick-built cottage in Hughes Lane dated 1901. 1838 map reference: 220


    Ivy Dene, Hughes Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 George Grove aged circa 39 occupied Ivydene.

    In 1949 'Ivydene' was occupied by George Grove, William Newman and Doris Newman.

    George and Muriel Grove sold a large amount of adjoining land used as smallholdings, which was developed to make Hughes Close. George then died and Muriel sold Ivy Dene to the Nutter Family. She moved into one of the houses on the other side of Hughes Lane. George's daughter still (2014) lives in Harvington.

    Barry? and Mavis Nutter lived in the house for a while. Mavis taught at Evesham College. She died young leaving a daughter Lucy. The family then moved to one of the Littletons.

    The Swainston Family bought the house from the Nutter's. Hugh and Christine Swainston moved to Worcester and then to Malvern.

    James Cottage: A semi-detached timber-framed thatched cottage covered in rendering. 1838 map reference: 176


    James Cottage, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    At some stage before 1916 Apple Tree Cottage and the adjoining James Cottage were rendered and probably at this stage acquired the names Ladbrook and Padmore. Bert and Bessie Shailer bought Ladbrook House (later James) and adjoining Padmore Cottage (later Apple Tree) circa 1916 for £250 and lived in Ladbrook with their two children Lilian and Connie. The property included the ground to the rear of the properties, now the gardens of the two Hop Kiln properties. The Shailer's, like the Rawlings after them, lived in Ladbrook and rented out Padmore.

    Apple Tree Cottage and James Cottage were occupied by Esmerelda Shailer, Ernest and Constance Rawlins, John Wand Beatrice Ward.


    Bert Shailer standing in the doorway.

    By the 1940's Bert and Bessie's daughter Connie and her husband Ed had moved into Ladbrook and Bessie was living in Padmore. The name Ladbrook had by then been dropped and there is a possibility that they called their home Church Cottage.

    Ladbrook was for a time the village Post Office in 1940's. There is still (2015) a postbox attached to the property. The Shailer's had taken over the Post business from the Cook Family and then Ernest Rawlings followed on as Post Master until he became Post Master at Salford, at which time Mrs Gostlow carried on the business from Ladbrook as a tenant. For further information on the Shailer and Rawlings families see Families.

    When elderly, Connie moved into Apple Tree Cottage and sold James Cottage to Peter (Pete) and Heather James. They in turn sold it to Peter (Pete) and Sheila Mirkzuk. The Mirkzuk's then sold it to Alistair & Jean McClyment née Massingham, whose father was a major Scrap Merchant in Birmingham. They sold part of the land behind to allow gardens for the newly converted hop kiln. Alistair died some years ago and Jean sold the property and moved to Solihull with her partner Keith. The Ashplant family bought the property from Jean in 2015.

    Justine: Name changed to Topaz. 1838 map reference: 108d
    Keeper's Cottage: Rendered house, probably Victorian. 1838 map reference: 54


    Keeper's Cottage, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    John and Margaret Marshall lived here until the early 1960's when they moved into Blakenhurst. They had two sons, Leslie and Tim (maybe Steve and Tim?).

    Bernard Oakey and Nancy, Margaret's sister moved in after John and Margaret and eventually bought the house off the Johnson's at Harvington Lodge.

    Tom Nash now (2017) lives here.

    Ladbrook House: Name changed to James Cottage.
    Langton House: A large Georgian House with garden and a range of outbuildings. 1838 map reference: 229


    Langton House, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    During the latter part of the 19th century Mr J. Stephenson, Rev., Winnington-Ingrams's curate, lived at Langton House:-

    John Stephenson, born Barnard Castle, Durham c1796. A shoemaker. He married Margaret, born Barnard Castle c1803. They had issue:-

    1. John G, born Bowes c1829. Living at Park House, Salford Priors with the Garrards in 1851 where he is described as classical and mathematical tutor.
    2. James Rablah, born Bowes, c1831.
    3. Mary, born Bowes c1833.
    4. Joseph Stephenson, born Bowes, Yorkshire c1838. Curate of Harvington from at least 1871-1881. By 1891 they were living at Crowle near Droitwich, where he was Vicar. He married Jane, born Bowes c1837 and had issue:-
      1. Edith Mary, born Harvington 1867.

      In 1939 'Langton House' was occupied by Emily Dixon and Grace Overbury.

      During WW2 the house was owned by a family called Russell. A J Russell and his wife ran a nursing home. At some stage they employed two Estonian girls. One of the elderly guests was an aristocratic Italian lady. A J Russell was a religious man and wrote a book called 'God Calling'. They moved to a larger house in Evesham called the 'Drift' in Greenhill Park where they continued their trade.

      Walter Allvey remembered that a BBC pianist stayed in the house, called Philip?

      In 1949 'Langton House' was occupied by Thomas and Gertrude Wheeler.

      For many years the property was owned by the Wheeler family who ran a building business from the outbuildings. T.V. Wheeler & Son built, among other properties, Oak Tree Road, Myatt's Field, the house in which Pip Stone lives in Finch Lane and also the porch to the Parish church.

      For more information on the Wheeler family see the page on Families.

    Lansdowne: A Victorian house side on to Leys Road. 1838 map reference: 7


    Lansdowne, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Lansdowne belonged to the Hughes Family. They were connected to the Bomfords. Miss Hughes circa 1988 moved into a new house she had built next door called Appledore.

    In 1939 'Lansdowne' was occupied by Michael Bomford, Violet Reynolds and Joan Moore. Violet Reynolds was in service. She was Harry Reynolds' sister. Harry Reynolds lives (2017) in Ragley Road.

    In 1949 'Lansdowne' was occupied by Mary, Edith Hughes.

    At some stage, probably in the 1980's, a house called 'Danvic' was built in its ground and very close to Lansdowne.

    Lantern Cottage: A brick-built cottage on Station Bank. 1838 map reference: 185


    Lantern Cottage, Station Bank.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    It is believed that this cottage was once called Sunnyside.

    In 1939 'Station Bank' (Sunnyside) was occupied by Dennis and Lilian Ludlow.

    In 1949 'Station Bank' (Sunnyside) was occupied by Dennis and Lillian Ludlow.

    Lester Gables: Name changed to The Gables.
    Leylands/leylandi: A large house built in the late 1930's. 1838 map reference: 7


    Leylands/Leylandi, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The original property was large and symmetrical but is now divided into two: 'Leylands' on the right and 'Leylandi' on the left with an extention on Leylands and a conservatory on Leyandi. The property was built by the Marsh family, the owners of the Black and White Coach Company, which stood on the corner of the Alcester Road and Leys Road, see under Black and White Garage. The Marsh's were listed in 1949 as living at the 'Leylands'.

    Albert Edward Marsh, was born 19 Feb 1901. He married in the Alcester area in 1926 Marjorie Southern, born 23 Feb 1902. Albert died in 1967 aged 66. They had issue:-

    1. Michael E, born Alcester area 1927.
    2. John B, born Harvington 1928.
    3. Malcolm C, born Harvington 1929.
    4. Brneda, born Harvington 1932.

    Subsequent owners were the Sutton family.

    The house probably once stood in a large piece of land or garden. This land was sold off in the 1980's to make way for 'Marsh Close' and 'The Rowens'. It was probably at this time that the house was divided, possibly by a developer.

    Leylandi was subsequently purchased by the Quincy family. It was they who purchased an extra piece of land off the developers to build the conservatory. They lived in the house for over 30 years until the house was recently [2017] sold it to the Collins family.

    Leys Road Council Houses: A row of 22 council houses built in the early 1930's just beyond Blakenhurst. Before Blakenhurst was built, they had long back gardens stretching back to the brook. 1838 map reference: 13


    Leys Road Council Houses, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Community Orchard and field above used to be Glebe land rented out to villagers. Horace New, who lived at No.10 in the 1940/50's had the first agricultural strip in the Community Orchard. He moved into Blakenhurst after his wife died. Mike Harris who lives No.1, Valley View, left No.11, in 1959.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number One

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 1 was occupied by Martha Eden.

    In 1949 1 Leys Road was occupied by Wlifred and Elsie Stephens and Martha Eden.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number two

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 2 was occupied by Francis and Violet Cresswell.

    In 1949 '2 Leys Road' was occupied by Francis and Violet Cresswell.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number three

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 3 was occupied by Christopher and Gertrude Dudfield.

    In 1949 '3 Leys Road' was occupied by Christopher and Gertrude Dudfield.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number four

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 4 was occupied by Harry and Emily Stanley.

    In 1949 '4 Leys Road' was occupied by Ronald, Oswald, Harry and Ivy Stanley.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number five

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 5 was occupied by Beatrice Bishop.

    In 1949 '5 Leys Road' was occupied by Victor and Beatrice Bishop.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number six

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 6 was occupied by Arthur and Flora Brewer.

    In 1949 '6 Leys Road' was occupied by Geoffrey, Mavis and Flora Brewer.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number seven

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 7 was occupied by Frederick and Mary Finch.

    In 1949 '7 Leys Road' was occupied by Frederick and Mary Finch.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number eight

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 8 was occupied by Frank and Nellie Finch.

    In 1949 '8 Leys Road' was occupied by Frank and Nellie Finch.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number nine

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 9 was occupied by Charle and Anne Taylor.

    In 1949 '9 Leys Road' was occupied by Charles and Annie Taylor.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number ten

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 10 was occupied by Arthur and Hilda New.

    In 1949 number 10 was occupied by Arthur and Hilda New and Eleanor and Eva Westbury.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number eleven

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 11 was occupied by Horace Harris.

    In 1949 '11 Leys Road' was occupied by Horace and Hilda Harris.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number twelve

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 12 was occupied by Walter Bishop.

    In 1949 '12 Leys Road' was occupied by Walter and Leslie Bishop and Arthur and Kate Wynne.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number thirteen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 13 was occupied by Frederick and Ellen Taylor.

    In 1949 '13 Leys Road' was occupied by Frederick and ---- Taylor.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number fourteen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 14 was occupied by Stephen and Sarah Ingram.

    In 1949 '14 Leys Road' was occupied by William, Sarah, Marion and James Ingram.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number fifteen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 15 was occupied by Herbert and Rhoda Best.

    In 1949 '15 Leys Road' was occupied by Herbert and Cathleen Best.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number sixteen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 16 was occupied by John and Elizabeth Roberts.

    In 1949 '16 Leys Road' was occupied by John and Elizabeth Roberts.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number seventeen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 17 was occupied by George and Fanny Bartlett.

    In 1949 '17 Leys Road' was occupied by George and Ethel Bartlett.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number eighteen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 18 was occupied by John and Edith Sanders?

    In 1949 '18 Leys Road' was occupied by Raymond and Gladys Addis.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number nineteen

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 19 was occupied by Walter and Annie Lannin?

    In 1949 '19 Leys Road' was occupied by Leslie and Annir Wright.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number twenty

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 20 was occupied by Herbert Jeffrey?

    In 1949 '20 Leys Road' was occupied by Morris and Iris Bundy and Herbert White.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number twenty one

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 21 was occupied by William Robbins.

    In 1949 '21 Leys Road' was occupied by William and Julia Robbins.

    Leys Road Council Houses: - number twenty two

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 number 22 was occupied by Arthur and Laura Bishop?

    In 1949 '22 Leys Road' there is no entry.

    Longlands: Now a large L-shaped property incorporating two Victorian field cottages. 1838 map reference: 112

    Longlands, Anchor lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    Mary Savage and her young family lived in to one of the cottages after the death from diphtheria of her husband and one of her daughters in 1878, They had moved from No. 4, Crooked Walls.

    John Fisher, of Longlands, was buried in the churchyard on 15th March 1913, aged 57 years.

    William Thomas Page, of Longlands, was buried 8th August 1925, aged 62 years.

    In 1939 'Longlands' was occupied by John and Lydia Nelmes.

    In 1949 'Longlands' was occupied by Sidney and Bessie Taylor.

    Magnolia: A house built in the 1950's. 1838 map reference: 99

    Magnolia, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This was the home of Keith and Elaine Ashmead.

    Malthouse: A timber-framed building, propbably seventeenth century. 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Malt House, including Bank Cottage, is a box timber-framed yeomans house thought to date from the mid-seventeenth century. It is built into the slope of a sunken lane and is raised from the roadside by a substantial Blue Lias wall. The main entrance is cut through this wall and rises steeply to the ground floor of the property. In this room there is an inglenook with a fine carved lintel supported by nicely shaped quorns, the fireplace is quite shallow. The chimney stack also serves the fireplace in number one Malthouse Cottage. There is an enclosed cupboard to the side which is again replicated in number 2. To the side of the cupboard is a blocked in doorway, once the corridor between the Malt House and Number one. The building shews some fine original pegged timber.

    The house is sandwiched between Bank Cottage and The Old Store. The name Malthouse derives from the activities of Samuel Stone Charles who owned the block of eight cottages along with the Bank House estate. Samuel is listed the 1851 Census as Maltster.

    The Malt House was for a time owned by the renowned Mrs Moss which she used as her living quarters for the adjacent Old Store, the whole a mixture of timber frame, Blue Lias and brick plus part of Bank Cottage. See under Families for a history of the Harris Family.

    The Deeds of Bank House indicate that in 1870 it, along with the other cottages, was sold only to be joined again to Bank House again in 1917 when Rosa Malin purchased the block of cottages from Joseph Cull. By this time it was known collectively as Malthouse cottages, there were eight cottages of which in 1917 Oliver Harris was a tenant in The Malt House.

    In 1939 'The Malt House' was occupied by Cyril and Kathleen Moss, Mrs Moss was a Harris by birth.

    In 1949 'The Stores, Malthouse Cotts' was occupied by Cyril and Kathleen Moss and Douglas and Kathleen Marshall.

    Mrs Moss died in 1985 and it was then that the Malt House and Malthouse cottages were divided into their now separate parts. The old front door was used again and the doorway between No.1, Malthouse Cottage and Malt House was blocked up. The whole was listed as grade two but that was when it was one property. The reparate portions are:-

    Malt House:
    Timber framed on a Blue Lias base, occupied by the Harris family and Mrs Moss from about 1884 to 1985. The adjacent bedroom in Bank Cottage was once a part of this property. It is presently (2016) owned by Nick & Sharon.

    Malthouse cottages numbers one and two:
    Blue Lias and brick construction, late eighteenth, early nineteenth or even early Victorian date. Now divided into two.

    No.1: This was once The Old Store now number one Malthouse Close.

    No.2: Owned by Anita & Nigel Barrett. Anita is granddaughter to Mrs Moss.

    Malthouse Close: A Blue Lias and brick terrace extending back from Stratford Road. 1838 map reference: 201

    On the corner was Mrs Moss shop The next two have dormer windows the last two are single storey. The terrace is made up of five properties (including the old Store), numbered one to five from the road. Above them was a field owned by the Harris/Marshalls, where the Moss family kept pigs. The land was developed to make way for Malthouse Close numbers 6 to 9.

    In 1870 the cottages, including the Malt House and Bank Cottage were owned by John Marshall and his relative Samuel Stone Charles of the property subsequently known as Bank House. The name Malthouse comes from the activities of Samuel Stone Charles who was a Maltster. The first mention so far of this block is in the Bank House Deeds in 1870. The block was sold in that year to Herbert New. In 1895 the Cull family acquired the block and in 1917 Rosa Malin of Bank House purchased them. The Malin's sold them to Cyril and Kathleen Moss in 1946.

    The Bsnk House Deeds record a number of tenants living seven to eight dwellings, which probably included Bank Cottage and the Malt House. Numbers four and five were barns at one time and numbers six to nine were built at a later date. This leaves us with a problem as to who was living where and for how long.

    In 1939 'Malt House Cottages' were occupied by William Bishop and his family, Ernest Ludlow and his family, Walter Bishop and his family, George and Caroline Massey.


    The Old Store, Stratford Road and the Malthouse Cottages, Malthouse Close.

    Number One: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The history of this building is entwined with Malt House, Bank Cottage, and Malthouse Cottages. Much of the property's early history is as yet unknown but it or they were part living and part working quarters. For a good part of the 20th century the corner portion was a shop called the Old Store. Oliver and Annie Harris lived here and it later became the home of their daughter Kathleen Joyce. Joyce married twice, her second husband, whom she married in 1930, was Cyril Moss and by the 1970's it was known as Moss's shop. They had purchased the property along with the Malt House and part of Bank Cottage from Walter Malin in 1946. It remained their home and shop until her death in 1985, at which time the business closed. The shop, part of Bank Cottage and the adjacent Malt House were sold to a builder who sold the cellar and one bedroom to Bank Cottage, while the Malthouse and the Old Store were sold as separate properties now called Malt House and No.1, Malthouse Cottages, the family retained and still (2016) own No.2.

    The Harris Family
    Much information has been gathered from Ancestry.co.uk and Mike Harris of Harvington with additions from others. For a full history of the Harris family see the page on Families.

    Joyce Moss was a real character in the village and there are many stories told of Joyce and her shop. Mrs Moss couldn't see the point of going on holiday and had never seen the sea. In the late 1970's she would refer to having to go "nextdoor to turn old Mossy". This was a reference to her husband Cyril Moss who was by that time confined to bed. She would often buy items from local people. Once a week went to the Tarry's, wholesalers in Evesham to gather supplies, she would also barter for supplies such as fruit in exchange for sweets etc. You would never be sure what would be for sale. A ham slicer was ready for use. She would be open all hours, a real corner shop.


    Eileen, daughter of Joyce Moss, outside the Old Store.


    Joyce (Grandma) Moss



    Eileen & Doug Marshall with their daughter Anita & her son Ricky, taken in 1983/4 outside the Old Store.


    Eileen Marshall, outside the Old Store.
    Number Two: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    From about 1905 onwards this was the home of William Bishop, garden labourer, and his wife Sarah. Their grandson David Bishop was born in number one on 1st September 1939. See under Families for details of their family.

    In 1949 '2 Malt House Cottages' was occupied by William and Sarah Bishop.

    Number Three: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 '3 Malt House Cottages' was occupied by Christopher (Paddy) and Florence (Floss) Glennon. Christopher Glennon and Florence Ludlow married in Harvington in 1947. He was Irish and had joined the British Army. As a Sargeant he helped to guard the German prisoners of war in the camp up Leys Road. The prisoners helped to clear the road of snow so that they could get to the church to marry. They lived in the village all their lives. They were still living in number 3 in the 1960's. He died circa 1990. Florence died circa 2008. See under Families for more details.

    They had issue:-

    1. Sandra M, born 1948. She married firstly Mr Hodgkins and Mr Webber secondly.

    Number Four: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 '4 Malt House Cottages' was occupied by Christina Mason, a retired teacher.

    Number Five: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1934 this became the home Walter H L Bishop, born Harvington 1913. He was married in 1934 to Hilda M Baylis and they lived at 4 Malthouse Cottages until they moved to Coles Cottages. Walter worked on Cole's farm. See the Bishop family for more detail.

    Kathleen Eileen Harris, born 1921, married? Doug Marshall a jobbing builder.

    In 1949 '5 Malt House Cottages' was not mentioned.

    Flos and Tim Young lived here.

    Number six: Numbers six to nine are bungalows set at a right angle to numbers one to four. 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 '6 Malt House Cottages' was occupied by Ann Massey.

    Number Seven: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Colonel Tooby, lived in bungalow, 7 Malthouse Close, in his latter years. He previously lived just into Station Road near to the Vicarage. Before Eileen McClare's death (of Crooked Walls) in 1975, he was most kind and supportive to her, a real gentleman and charactor, a small man with a goatee beard. He helped the McClare family by showing prospective buyers of Crooked Walls, such as Joy and Ken Davies, the property. He was small dapper guy with quite a commanding charactor and helped in organising proposals for the new bypass. He was a frequent visitor to The Old Store. He once described the storekeeper Mrs Moss, a great village charactor, as 'a mine of unreliable information' and her granddaughter Emma, who was somewhat overweight as 'having a six sausage figure'. Mrs Moss used to boast at how many sausages Emma could eat.

    His headstone in the new churchyard reads:- In Memory of / FREDERICK W TOOBY / Born 24th March 1907 / Died 7th January 1981 / Served many in the World / Came to rest here in Harvington.

    Frederick William Tooby was born in Edmonton, Hertfordshire, the son of Alfred Charles Tooby, 1883-1959, and Emma Giddings, 1883-1971. His siblings were Marjorie and Victor.

    Number Eight: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Number Nine: 1838 map reference: 201

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 2010's Brian and Jenny Egan lived here. Mr Egan was a nice man with a lovely sense of humour. He was tall man from, the Tyneside and sang with with the Harvington Singers. He died in 2015.

    Monica Metcalf now (2018) lives here. She lived before in one of the Coles cottages and before that in one of the Rowberry cottages.

    Malthouse Cottages: See Malthouse Close and Malt House. 1838 map reference: 174
    Mandeville: A bungalow, probably built in the 1930's, now demolished. 1838 map reference: 171
    along with the adjacent buildings war demolished in the 1980's.


    Part of Mandeville seen to the right of the men.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The bungalow stood in Evesham Road to the left of the Harvington Trailers complex. It was the home of the Coley family. The bungalow

    In 1939 it was the home of Reginald and Doris Coley.

    In 1949 it was the home of Wilfred and Gwendoline Willis.

    Manor Farm: timber framed with cruck, fourteenth century in part. 1838 map reference: 31


    Manor Farm, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Manor Farm has a long and complicated history which has yet to be written.

    Kempe Harward rented Manor Farm on 23rd June 1641.

    The Bullock's were farmers at the Manor Farm from about 1832. See the page on Families for more information on the Bullocks.

    In the mid 20th century Manor Farm was owned by a Mr Brown, he had lived in the house with his parents. He was related to Mr Vine which was his mother's maiden name. He had a housekeeper called Mrs Golding. Mike Harris' Dad rented one of the barns.

    In the 1939 census the house was occupied by Bailey and Annie Barber.

    In 1949 'Manor Farm' was occupied by William Brown and Ada Goulding.

    The farm was still a fully fledged farm until after its purchase by the Byrd family. Two bypasses truncated the land from the farm house. The house was sold separately, the medieval outbuildings demolished and Manor Close was built.

    Mill House: A large property situated to the north of The Mill. 1838 map reference: 238/9/40


    Mill House, Anchor Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The original farmhouse is thought to date from 1700. A large bread-making business was run from here in Victorian times. The outbuildings, which have now been converted to holiday cottages, was where the bread was baked from flour ground at the mill. The loaves were then transported by train to feed ever expanding Birmingham.

    In 1939 'Mill House' was occupied by Charles and Harriet Grice.

    In 1949 'Mill House' was occupied by Charles and Harriet Grice.

    The property is owned (2015) by Simon Greenhaugh who ran hotel and restaurant business for a while.

    Mona Cottage: A semi-detached cottage, with a date of 1912 above the door. This is presumably the date when both properties were either built or constructed out of a previous building. The 1838 map indicates that a building occupied this site. Its semi-detached partner is Horse Shoe Cottage. At one time a bedroom of Horse Shoe Cottage was part of Mona to allow more space for the Hughes family. 1838 map reference: 222


    Mona Cottage, Hughes Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Mona Cottage' was occupied by William and Lilian Bromley.

    In 1949 'Mona Cottage' was occupied by William and Lilian Bromley.

    This was the home of the Hughes family and also of the Bromley's, Jean Spires née Bromley, was born here in 1943. See the page on Families for further information on the Bromley family.

    John Hughes aged 68 and his wife Elizabeth aged 51 lived in Norton in 1911 with their son Edgar aged 15. John was a labourer and later lived in Mona Cottage. They had issue:-

    1. Edgar, aged 15 in 1911.
    2. Lily, was married in 1904, Thomas Albert Mansell and had issue. See the Mansell family for further information. Lily used to own the row of three cottages on Cress Hill called Valley View. She was the aunt of Jean Spires.
    3. Janet, born Norton 1886. She was married 1903 to William John Bromley. She died in 1959 aged 73. Again see the Bromley family for further information.
    4. Elsie E, married in 1911 Cyril R E Prowlin and lived in The Retreat.
    Myatt's Field: Myatt's Field is a small development off VIllage Street built before 1975. 1838 map reference: 87

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Charles Myatt is identified as a seedsman in Harvington in the 1896 Kelly’s Directory for Worcestershire, and he is also named as a member of the first Parish Council in 1895. His son, Charles William Myatt (aged 18) is mentioned in Marjorie Bayley’s notes as being the first person buried in the new churchyard in 1915.

    Oak Tree Cottage: The left hand of a pair of cottages dated to around 1900. 1838 map reference: 108d


    Oak Tree and Topaz, Cress Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    One of the documents in the Deeds of Candle Cottage is a reference to the Skinner's owning Oak Tree Villas in 1908. Note the reference to Villas, this suggests that its twin 'Topas' was included.

    In the 1940's both cottages were owned by the Marsh of Black and White Garages of Harvington to house their coach drivers. Tenants Jean and Ron Williams lived in the house until 1969. It was empty for two years until Wendy and Ian Roberts (died 2003) bought the property in 1971. They lived there until 2003 when Wendy moved to Mickleton.

    Oldfields: A house built in the 1920/30's. 1838 map reference: 31


    Oldfields, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1939 census 'Oldfields' was occupied by Samuel and Edith Coley.

    Samuel Coley had started out as a market gardener and had made his money after WWI. He bought the Goldern Cross and attracted coach loads of munition workers to his pub from Redditch.

    In 1949 'Oldfields' was occupied by Reginald and Doris Coley.

    It was later bought by Rowena and Roger Warrington. Rowena sold the property in 2016.


    Oldfields Camp
    In 1949 'Oldfields Camp' was occupied by the following:-
    Joseph Brown, Joseph Cooper, Samuel French, James and Eileen James, Benjamin Morgan, Richard Westwood.

    This was not a camp as such but a group of huts on the Coley's land adjacent to their Oldfields House. They were rememberedfor housing of trumps or itinerant workers.

    Orchard Close: A twentieth Century house in its own grounds. The property was built for the Tyack family in 1933. 1838 map reference: 89


    Orchard Close, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    The house was built by the Tyack family.

    In 1939 'Orchard Close' was occupied by Victor and Elsie Tyack.

    In 1949 'Orchard Close' was occupied by Victor and Elsie Tyack.

    Their daughter Hilary M. married in 1953 Keith D Sinclair, a builder.

    The home of Hugh & Liz Nunn, horticulturalists. They are plantsmen, specialising in hellebores known as 'Harvington Hellebores'. For many years Mr Nunn has planted roadside trees from the parish boundary to the approaches of the village. He was Harvington's own 'The Man who Planted Trees' by Jean Giono. The novel is about a shepherd in the south of France who planted many thousands of trees, thereby bringing life to an otherwise treeless countryside. They sold the property in 2015 with some of the land being sold separately.

    Padmore Cottage: Name changed to Apple Tree Cottage. 1838 map reference: 176
    Pax Villa: Name of the middle dwelling of Cross Cottages in 1939. 1838 map reference: 87
    Pikelands: Name changed to Orchard House. 1838 map reference: 190
    Plaswyn: House built in the 1920/30's 's. 1838 map reference: 31


    Plaswyn, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Plaswyn' was occupied by George and Harriette Gibbons.

    In 1949 'Plaswyn' was occupied by Walter and Phyllis Crew.

    Pool Cottage: Built of Blue Lias, the oldest part is believed to date to 1640. 1838 map reference: 225


    Pool Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Pool Cottage' was occupied by Albert Langstone and his family.

    In 1949 'Pool Cottage' was occupied by Albert and Lydia Langstone.

    There is a small attached building to the nearby barn. This was used as a barber's shop for a short while by Walter Alfred Allvey, late from London, the father of Walter Allvey.

    Pool House: Built of Blue Lias. 1838 map reference: 224/5


    Pool House, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Pool House' was occupied by William Jones.

    In 1949 'Pool House' was occupied by William Jones and Arnold and Evelyn Langley.

    Owned by the Langley's in the 1950-60s. John Langley lives (2015) just around the corner in Village Street.

    Poplar Cottage: Brick lodge built in 1874 as part of the Cedar Lodge estate. 1838 map reference: 78


    Poplar Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Poplar Cottage was built, along with Cedar Lodge, by Job Jelf in 1874. Cedar Lodge and Poplar Cottage were so named by at least 1880. They were owned by the Penney family until 1925 when the estate was purchased by Frank Morgan of Evesham. Poplar Cottage was apparently built for the Butler to Cedar Lodge, see under Cedar Lodge for the full story.

    Mrs Rebecca Knight occupied the cottage for many years from as early as 1875 until just prior to 1920.

    Frank Morgan of Evesham broke up the estate up by selling off Cedar Lodge, its garden, outbuildings and orchard. From then on the history of Poplar Cottage is seperate to that of Cedar Lodge.

    From 1919/20, this was the home of William (Bill) Meek, who was for many years a Churchwarden. William Meek, born Whitbourne, Worcs, aged 35 in 1911, a Coal Merchant. He was married at Harvington in 1895 to Mabel Davis, who was born Harvington aged 35 in 1911. They had issue:-

    1. Gertrude Agnes, born Harvington 1906. She was married at Harvington in 1929 to Walter C Bywater. They lived in Ferndale in Leys Road, the house where Mr John Walsh, has (2015) his garage. They had issue:-
    2. Dorothy Rowe, born at Harvington in 1909. She was married at Harvington in 1932 to William G Barber.

    In 1939 Mrs Meek lived at Poplar Cottage.

    In 1949 'Poplars' was occupied by William and Mabel Meek.

    Post Office Cottages: A row of four tenements known as 'Post Office Cottages'. There were built of brick in the 1880/90's by John Cook, Village Post Master. They were demolished sometime in the 1960/70's. 1838 map reference: 90

    No known photograph of
    Post Office Cottages, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1858 the cottages were occupied by John Pestridge, David Haywood, John Williams and William Eden, (ref: Cotswold View Deeds).

    The cottages were set at right angles to the road just behind and to the side of Cotswold View and occupied only a small strip of land. Walter Allvey, who worked on them in the 1940's, remembered that they had sash windows and faced west. Their numbering was 1 to 4 starting from the Village Street end.

    In a Deed from Cotswold View dated 19th June 1919, they had been occupied by:-

    1. William Eden
    2. Henry Newman
    3. Eli Smith
    4. John Fowler
    - but were then occupied by:-
    1. J H Tyack
    2. Walter Archer
    3. Mrs Mason
    4. Arthur William Fowler. The Fowler family later owned the Hop Pole complex.

    In the 1939 census they were occupied by:-

    1. [No.1:] Ellen & Emily Holder.
    2. [No.2:] Herbert & Dorothy Halfpenny.
    3. [No.3:] Walter, Rosa & Cecyl Archer.
    4. [No.4:] Francis & Violet Robbins.

    In 1949 they were occupied by:-

    1. [No.1:] Emily May Holder, Edith May Harris & Victor James Harris.
    2. [No.2:] Edith Fisher. Edith was on the Parish Council in the late 1940's and early 1950's. She kept a collection of parish material which has now been published on this site under Parish Council. She later lived in Ragley Road and her home is now (2014) occupied by her granddaughter Gillian.
    3. [No.3:] Walter & Rosa Archer.
    4. [No.4:] Francis & Violet Robbins. Their son Christopher is depicted in a school photograph on page 41 of the Millennium book.

    In 1952/3. Information from Harry Reynolds of 9 Ragley Road.

    1. [No.1:] Emily Holder, spinster, was living on her own and the Harris' were living in Ragley Road.
    2. [No.2:] Edith Fisher had moved and was one of the first to live into the newly built Ragley Road houses. It was then occupied by Tom and Rose Reynolds from Woodbine Cottage. After Post Office Cottages were demolished, they moved into the newly built Post Office bungalows.
    3. [No.3:] Walter and Rosa Archer were still living there.
    4. [No.4:] Francis and Violet Robbins were still living there.

    Rectory Cottage: Within the grounds of The Rectory facing the junction of Village Street and Finch (Rectory) Lane, was a cottage or house with a barn to the left in the photograph. The cottage appears as a habitation on the 1838 map. 1838 map reference: 237


    Site of Rectory Cottage, Finch Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Nothing is known of this building other than its depiction on the 1838 map. It appears to have gone by 1900. There is nothing on the ground to indicate a building except the boundary at this point is unusual in being composed of Blue Lias stone blocks along with an unexplained carve. There is a very faint possibility that this building was the predecessor of the Rectory called 'The Parsonage' in the 17th century', but this is pure conjecture.

    Rose Cottage: Timber framed and partly thatched cottage. 1838 map reference: 207


    Rose Cottage, Finch Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Originaly called Walker's Cottage in Rectory Lane.

    Used to be the home of Mr Cutler who worked for the Bomford's at Pitchill.

    In 1949 'Rose Cottage' was the home of William and Nellie Hiorns.

    Hiorn Family
    Thomas Hiorns, born Bishops Tachbrook 1838. A labourer. He married Sarah Edwards at Westwood, Stoneleigh on 25th Nov 1861. They had issue:-

    1. Alice Elizabeth, born Tachbrook 1864.
    2. Agnes, born 1867.
    3. Charles Arthur, born Birmingham 1868, married Sarah Ann Tomalin at Aston in 1891. He died Birmingham 1948, aged 79. She died Birmingham 1953, aged 81. They had issue:-
      1. William Thomas, born Aston 1908?. While in Harvington he worked as a driver for Midland Red. At least between 1942 and 1949 he lived with his first wife Nellie. The family broke up, he moved to Birmingham and Nellie ended up in the Meriden area by which time he produced four children. In Birmingham he had a further two children and after divorcing Nellie married Lily in 1974. The two children by Lily never knew of their half brothers and sister.

        He was married in Birmingham to Nellie M West in 1930. She may have been In 1939 she was registered as living 128 Brierfield Road, Birmingham, born 26 May 1907, unpaid domestic duties. By Nellie he had:-

        1. Arnold T, born Birmingham 1933.
        2. Gerald W, born Birmingham 30 Aug 1937. One of the Harvington school photos in Notes & Queries has an image of him, he used to sit next to John Shailer. Mr Shailer said that the family left the village about 1950. He was married to Jacqueline Fulbrook on 3 Mar 1962. He now lives (2017) in Stourbridge. They had issue:-
          1. David.
          2. Katherine.
        3. Alan G, born Birmingham 1940.
        4. Olive C, born Harvington 1942.
        He married Lily Wagstaff née Barnett in 1974. By Lily he had:-
        1. David W, born Birmingham 1959.
        2. Cheryl A, born Birmingham 1961.
    4. Florence, married Aston 1925 to William G Manton.

    On 29th July 1889 Clarice Walker of Finch Hay, the neighbouring cottage, sold a square plot of land behind the garden to Rose Cottage, to Graham Collingwood Underhill of Moseley in Birmingham. This plot is now part of the garden of Rose Cottage, which is still (2118) owned by Mr Underhill.

    Rose Villa: Semi-detached properties on the Alcester Road near the junction with Village Street. They have a date plaque: Rose Villa / 1881. 1838 map reference: 83


    Rose Villa, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The property was divided into one & two, one being nearest the cross:-

    1/
    From 1939 to 1962 this was the home of Herbert J and Elsie Buttler. They married in 1939. Herbert and Elsie Buttler at first rented Rose Villa off Mr Bromley, the Undertaker and only later purchased the Villa for £300. In 1959 Bert, Elsie and their daughter Doreen with her husband Ron Andrews moved into number two. In 1961 Bert and Elsie moved into the newly built 'Shirlholme' and Rose Villa was sold, Doreen and Ron moved in to number 2, Rowberry Cottages.

    In the 1939 Census 'Rose Cottage' was occupied by Herbert J Buttler. The name here is an error, it should have read 'Rose Villa'.

    In the 1949 Electoral Roll 'Rose Villa' was occupied by Herbert and Walter Buttler, where is Herbert's wife Elsie?

    Number one was later occupied by Mr and Mrs Taylor.

    2/
    It was occupied by Mr Wicks. This is probably Harry Wicks, private gardner and special constable, a married man born 10th Sep 1883, who in the 1939 Census is recorded as living in 'Cross Cottage', Alcester Road. He is still there in the 1949 Electoral Roll, was Rose Villa (number two) then called Cross Cottage?

    Mrs N Shipman was the next occupier until presumably 1959.

    In 1959 Doreen and Ron Andrews moved in into this property until they moved to No.2 Rowberry Cottages.

    The next occupier was Tony Sabin.

    Rowberry Cottages: A row of three Victorian cottages on Leys Road built at a distance from the village. 1838 map reference: 41

    Rowberry Cottages, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Number one:-
    In the 1939 Census Reginald, farm foreman (born 5th August 1907) and Kathleen, land worker (born 29th Sep 1910) Harwood were living here along with Fanny Allen, (born 3rd April 1866).

    In the 1949 Electoral Roll Mrs Edith Ward was living here.

    Tom and Joan Newman with Peter and Robert, A Peter Pugh also lived here. (See Families)

    Mr and Mrs Pierperot

    Peter Hall and Sue with David and Karen? They live here in 2018.

    Number two:-
    In the 1939 Census Charles, farm worker (born 17th Feb 1910) and Alice Margaret Sparrow (born 10th Feb 1914) lived here, they were still here in 1949. She later became a Harwood.

    Mr and Mrs C Vallender

    Ron and Doreen Andrews, with daughter Lesley and son David. In 2018 this is still the home of David.

    Number three:-
    In the 1939 Census Edgar, farm labourer (born 22nd Sep 1886) and Annie, land worker (born 25th Feb 1888) Walker were living here. They were still here in 1949 along with Edith Ward.

    Mr and Mrs J Metcalfe with children. Monica Metcalfe lived here with her husband and their three children.

    Mr and Mrs M Philips with children

    All the above rented No.3 until the Philips left in 2015 when it was sold by the Johnson's at Harvington Lodge.

    Seaton : A bungalow built in the 1930's. 1838 map reference: 7


    Seaton.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Built by the Marsh Family of the Black and White Coach Company.

    In 1939 'Seaton' is occupied by William Westbury, born 6th June 1866, a retired gardner, and Caroline S Westbury, born 26th Jun 1863.

    In 1949 'Seaton' is occupied by Caroline S Westbury, Rex W J and Gertrude N Ashby

    Seroule: Not known but mentioned in the 1939 census as near to Orchard Close and Cross Cottages. 1838 map reference: 89

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Seroule' was occupied by Mary Tyack. The Tyacks lived next to this dwelling at Orchard Close.

    In 1949 'Seroule' was occupied by Donald and Margaret Knight.

    The property was owned by Albert Edward Marsh of the Black and White Coach Company and tenanted by Don (big John) Knight who worked for him.

    Shakespeare Cottages: A row of four tenements known as 'Shakespeare Cottages'. They are so named after the nearby Shakespeare pub. 1838 map reference: 182


    Shakespeare, Shakespeare Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Although they were built as four tenements but now exist as two cottages.

    In the 1930's they had one stand pipe and the communal toilets and wash house were in the corner beyond number four and in the 1940's the toilets were upgraded to flush. Walter Allvey in 2018 remembered Jack White clutching at his trouser belt as he descended to the toilet block as it was set below the level of the properties.

    In 1939 they were occupied by:-

    1. not mentioned.
    2. Walter and Noris Withers.
    3. Frederick and Beatrice Hodgkins.
    4. Reginald (Jack) and Sarah White.

    In the 1949 list of residents:-

    1. 1 Shakespeare Cottages' was occupied by Walter and Muriel Allvey. At that time number one was the only one that had electricity and there was one standing water tap for all four tenements. Walter and his wife lived in the house for about five years and there son Leon was born in there in 1947.
    2. 2 Shakespeare Cottages' was occupied by Walter (Walt) and Noris Withers.
    3. 3 Shakespeare Cottages' was occupied by Frederick and Beatrice Hodgkins. Beatrice was Muriel Allvey's mother, a Taylor.
    4. 4 Shakespeare Cottages' was occupied by an elderly couple called Reginald and Sarah White. For more details on the White Family see under Families

    There is a story about a murder at No.1, The John's, were a Gypsy family from Norton. Reggy Johns was living here and was visited by a friend. They were drinking and an arguement ensued. Reggy hit the friend with an axe and seriously injured him. He took him to hospital but he later died of his injury. Reggy was charged with murder and went to prison.

    Shepherds Cottage: Name changed to Ye Olde Cottage. 1838 map reference: 226
    Shepherds Grove: Built within recent years in an old style. 1838 map reference: 226


    Shepherds Grove, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Built by Kenneth and Mary Wheeler.

    Shirlholme: A house built in 1961 upon a piece of land called Hawkes Piece, demolished in 2006. 1838 map reference: 94


    Shirlholme, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Shirlholme was built upon Hawkes Piece in 1961 by Bert & Elsie Buttler. Bert Buttler was a builder. In their latter years they grew and sold vegetables grown upon the large plot of land behind. Part of the land was sold in 1990 to build the neighbouring Teasel Cottage. On the death of Elsie the remaining property was sold by auction in 2006 and demolished. The land was subsequently developed, see under Hawkes Piece. The Butler's previously lived in Rose Cottage in Alcester Road.


    Shirlholme, Alcester Road, for sale in 2006.

    Buttler Family
    Herbert J Buttler, born 8 Nov 1916, In 1939 he was a carpenter and lived in Rose Cottage, [mistake for Villa]. He was married in the Pershore area in 1939 to Elsie Hemming. In 1949 Herbert was living in Rose Villa but with a Walter C Buttler, where is Elsie? They had issue:-

    1. Doreen, married 1stly Ron Andrews lived at 2 Rowberry Cottages.
      1. Leslie J
      2. David J , lives 2 Rowberry Cottages.
      She married 2ndly George Marshall of number 6 Brickyard Cottages where they now (2017) live.
    2. Shirley, lived in Orchard Place.

    Smith's Cottage: This dear little thatched cottage was demolished in 1919. The name Smith comes from a postcard dated to circa 1905 where it is named as Smiths Cottage. 1838 map reference: 90


    Spinks Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    By 1858 Thomas Hawkes had left the Cottage, successor not known. The last occupier prior to its demolition in 1919 was W Spinks, see Cotswold View Deeds. W. Spinks has as yet not been traced but the following details of the Spinks family have been extracted from the 1911 Census. Fred Spinks, born Harvington, aged 44, living Audenshaw as a miner's labourer with wife Sarah Ann, aged 42 & children Charles, Nellie, Albert & Harry. Charles Spinks, born Harvington, aged 34, living Kings Norton with wife Anna, aged 36 & children Charles H., John S., Nellie, Sarah A, & Beatrice A.

    Starlings: Name changed to Birch House.
    Station Bank Cottage: Name changed to Candle Cottage.
    Station House: The old railway station. Built in 1866, the railway closed to passengers in 1963. 1838 map reference: 111


    Station House, Station Bank.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    "Date opened: 17.9.1866 Location: At the end of Anchor Lane Company on opening: Evesham & Redditch Railway Date closed to passengers: 17.9.1963 (last train ran on 1.10.1962 then replaced by bus) Date closed completely: 17.9.1963 Company on closing: British Rail (Western Region) Present state: The station is still extant and has been converted into a private residence. A coach stands in the platform. The arch under the road bridge has also been converted into a residence." Taken from Disused Stations.

    In 1939 'Station House' was occupied by George and Doris Smith.

    In 1949 'Station House' was occupied by Ada Davies.

    Stone Barn: An old barn, converted in the 1980/90's. 1838 map reference: 214


    Stone Barn, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    The barn was part of the Grange estate. It was converted in 1987 and is now (2017) the home of Richard & Marilyn Baugh.


    These photographs were taken by David Lee shortly before its conversion. He lived opposite and died in 2016.

    Sunnybank: A semi-detached Victorian House, along with 'Ferndale'. 1838 map reference: 9


    Sunnybank, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This was the home, for a time, of a branch of the Mansell family. They were a large family and lived in various properties in Harvington. See the page on Families.

    In 1911 John Mansell, aged 61, and his wife Sarah, aged 57 and son Thomas, aged 30 were living in 'Sunnybank'.

    In 1911 William Henry Mansell, House painter, aged 28, wife Alice Maude Mary, aged 31, Frederick William, aged 3, and Bernard George aged 1/12 were also living in 'Sunnybank'.

    Mr & Mrs Brooks with their son Colin lived here.

    Sunnyside: Name changed to Lantern Cottage.
    Thatchholm: A timber framed thatched cottage. 1838 map reference: 184


    Thatchholm, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Thatchholm' was occupied by John and Eva Collett.

    In 1949 'Thatchholm is occupied by Samuel and Theresa McNaughton.

    The Bunn family lived here in the 1970/80's. Elaine Rose Bunn ran a little antique shop called Magpie in Cowl Street in Evesham. They now run (2015) 'Magpie', Manchester House, 1 High Street, Evesham.

    Thatchways: A timber framed thatched cottage. 1838 map reference: 186


    Thatchways, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 'Thatchways' is occupied by Robert and Gwyneth Gubbins.

    It is now (2016) the home of Andy and Ruth Clements.

    Shepherds Cottage: See number 10, Brickyard Cottages. 1838 map reference: 97
    The Barn: Old outbuildings once belonging to The Limes. They were converted into a property called 'The Barn' in the 1980/90's. 1838 map reference: 214


    The Barn, Shakespeare Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Barn was built as a general agricultural building for the farmhouse, now known as The Limes. It was probably built in the early 19th century, as it does not feature on the enclosure map of 1787, but is fully marked, along with other farm buildings, on a similar map dated 1838. It was used to house carts, horses and all the equipment associated with farming at that time, while additional outbuildings around the farmyard were used as calving sheds and pigsties for about 20 pigs.

    The present owners of 'The Barn' have been told that the hay loft was used as a hiding place for tinned food and other stores during WW11, to use as emergency rations should the country be invaded.

    In 1965, when The Limes and its outbuildings were sold, the barn is described as a 'three-bay brick piered shed opening directly on to the side road (Shakespeare Lane), 29 feet by 19 feet internally. Suitable as a three car garage with loft over, reached by steps at the side'.

    The purchasers of The Limes at that time were not farmers. They built an outdoor, unheated swimming pool in the farmyard, and used some of the outbuildings as changing rooms. The present owners have been told that some memorable poolside parties were held at The Limes.

    In the mid 1970s, the barn complex was sold for development. The main part of the building was converted into a house. The outbuildings were largely left as they were, to be used for storage. The builder who did the conversion lived in the house for about 18 months and then sold it to Mr & Mrs K Jalland. They enlarged the house to create a new kitchen over a car port, and converted the swimming pool into an attractive sunken garden. They also created a small annexe, by adding an additional room to the farm building on the far side of the old farmyard. By now, most of the pig sties had been demolished – only a small section now remains.

    In 1990, the house was bought by Mr & Mrs A Grey. They further added to the property, by filling in the car port to create a utility room and shower room, upgrading the annexe and later adding a garage in the style of the original barn, with brick piers either side of a shallow arch.
    Anthony Grey, 2015.

    The Barns: These used to the outbuildings of Langton House before being converted in the 1980/90's into a number of dwellings. 1838 map reference: 223a


    The Barns, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Bungalow, Hughes Lane: Name changed to Well Cottage. 1838 map reference: 220
    The Bungalow, Station Road: Built circa 1920. 1838 map reference: 108


    The Bungalow, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1949 'The Bungalow' was occupied by Cyril and Harriet Shailer.

    The Bungalow was built by Cyril and Harriet Shailer who lived here for many years.

    The Caravan: An old caravan on a piece of land to the left of the track leading to the now ruined Hill Farm off the Alcester Road. 1838 map reference: 6


    The Caravan, Harvington Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The caravan is now unused (2014) but for a while it was the home of Bill Mouldon after The Hill had became ruinous. His wife had passed away and he lived there until he died.

    The Close: House built by the Brazier family in the early 20th Century. 1838 map reference: 226


    The Close, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The Brazier's owned the land, situated between the properties on Village Street, Station Road and down to Church Street opposite Crooked Walls. The first property to be built on the land was The Close, sometime after 1921. Others followed on Station Road, the last and central section to go was in the 1970's, when what is now St James's Close was built.

    Ralph Leonard Brazier and his wife Hilda née Towers, were the property's first occupants. They lived here until 1978, when Hilda passed away.

    In 1939 'The Close' was occupied by Ralph and Hilda Brazier.

    In 1949 'The Close' was occupied by Ralph, Hugh and Hilda Brazier and Arther Brewer.

    The house is now owned by the Byrd family.

    The Coach and Horses: This is a classic coaching inn dating from the late eighteenth century or early nineteenth. It does however incorporate and early timber-framed building. Fortunately, unlike many country inns, it still retains some of its original features such as the split between the lounge and public bars. It still retains its range of outbuildings, once used for stabling but now for a number of utilities such as a smart function room. 1838 map reference: 230


    The Coach and Horses, Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Coach and Horses Inn' was occupied by Sidney and Elizabeth Fakes.

    In 1949 'Coach and Horses' was occupied by Sidney and Hilda Fakes.

    Please use this link for a history and description of the Coach and Horses.

    The Gables: Two semi-detached houses. 1838 map reference: 89


    The Gables, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In the 1939 census 'Lester Gables' were occupied by Arthur and Emma Blotheridge & John and Elsie Redfern. In 1949 Arthur and Emma Blotheridge were living in 'Black & White Cottage, Main Street'.

    In 1949 'The Gables' was occupied by Lawrence and Winifred Blotheridge, Elsie Oldnall, John and Elsie Redfern.

    The Grange: A large stone house. 1838 map reference: 212


    The Grange, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    An important house those history is still to be written.

    George Frederick Bomford, Fred, was born 19 Dec 1876 at Atch Lench, died 1953 at Harvington. He was married 1904 to Annette Louisa Lewis, born 1 Dec 1854, died 2 Sep 1936 at Harvington. He lived at The Grange and farmed in quite a big way, owning a set of steam engines at one time. In addition to the grange farm he owned a farm at Aldington and was tenant of the Atch Lench farm. He had no children, but Annette's niece Lilian Morrow came to live with them and stayed on to care for Fred in his old age. She appears on a WI photograph taken in the 1950's.

    In 1939 'The Grange' was occupied by George Bomford.

    In 1949 'The Grange' was occupied by George Bomford and Lilian Morrow.

    The house was actioned in the 1970's and Samuel Coley purchased it along with much of the land south of the Alcester/Evesham Road, see Bomford History. Sam's son Reg lived in The Golden Cross & had Ann, John, Sue & George.

    The Green: A small semi-detached brick-built cottage. 1838 map reference: 224


    The Green Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The cottage, which has been known as 'The Green Cottage' since at least 1939, is thought to date from 1684. On the inside it displays much old timber and was probably once timber framed on the outside.

    Pickering
    This was probably the home of Annie Pickering from at least 1901 until 1939 where she was a widow and a tenant. For many years she was a school teacher at the infant school. She died in 1940 aged 82. Ann was born in Harvington circa 1858. She married John Pickering, born Brailes circa 1842 sometime between 1891 and 1901. John was a stonemason and died 1907 aged 65.

    Wood
    Alfred William Wood and Barbara Selina Wood lived in The Green from 1939 to 1987. In the 1960's a Mrs Panchita Wood lived here. The Wood family were tenants and purchased the freehold in 1973.

    The freehold was owned by the Penney Family of Cedar Lodge. In 1940 Miss Mary Jane Penney sold the freehold to William H Dean, Esq.

    In 1939 'near Green' was occupied by Annie Pickering.

    In 1949 'Green Cottage' was apparently empty, but at this time the Woods occupied The Green so maybe they were missed off the 1949 Electoral Roll.

    Presently (2018) owned by Teresa Anita Ireland who purchased it from the Woods in September 1987.

    The Hop Kiln 1 & 2: The old hop kiln was converted into two properties in the 1980's. 1838 map reference: 176

    Hop Kiln No. 1 & 2, off Church Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    During the conversion, land was purchased from the owner of James Cottage to allow for the drives and gardens to the two properties.

    The Laurels: Traditional half-timbered farmhouse with a Georgian extension. 1838 map reference: 196

    The Laurels, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    It is believed that the Georgian extension was built by a gentleman returning from Waterloo.

    The Garrard family
    From 1895 a firm of Evesham Solicitors lived at The Laurels, "having moved there from a very substantial residence on the Broadway road, when their business collapsed after a period of living in grand style. Later the Reverend Samuel Bromley Garrard, Vicar of Salford Priors rented the house for his family home". Rev Garrard's family being his brother George Henry Garrard, of New Prance & Garrard. Both the bankruptcy and the Reverend Garrard are mentioned in the Deeds of Cotswold View.

    For more information on the Garrard family see the page on Families.

    The Bomford family
    The family lived here in the early 20th century. For a fuller picture of the Bomford's and their interest in Harvington, please click:- The Bomfords

    In 1920 The Laurels House and adjacent buildings were bought from the Harvington Lodge estate (owned by Bomford) by R. and B. Bomford. Alfred W Bomford, born 1868 was an engineer in Belper in 1911, styled widower. He died at the Laurels in 1924 aged 55. His aunt, Caroline and her son Jack lived on at the house until 1927 when she married Mr. A.H. Cutler and moved to Cedar Lodge. Jack lived on at The Laurels and he had an extra room built on to the house.

    During WW2 the cellar improvised as an air raid shelter.

    In 1939 'The Laurels' was occupied by John Bomford.

    In 1949 'The Laurels' was occupied by John and Benjamin Bomford.

    Jack Bomford, one of the sons of Alfred and Caroline Bomford, lived on at the Laurels until his death in 1977. After Jack died the house and contents were sold by auction. Jean and Anne, his nieces, were the main legatees.

    The Bragg family
    The Bragg family lived here from 1977 until 1999.

    Duncan and Jill now live in the house.

    The Limes: A large timber-framed farm house. There was a well in the grounds of this property. 1838 map reference: 183


    The Limes, Shakespeare Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    The Stratton family bought the farm from the Bomford Estate in 1920. Under the Strattons it was a dairy farm. see the Stratton family in the page on Families.

    In 1939 'The Limes' was occupied by the Stratton sisters.

    In 1949 'The Limes' was occupied by the Stratton Sisters.

    Keith and Judy Beeson bought The Limes from another family in the early 1980's. Keith died in the late 2000's and Judy sold the property c2010 and now (2015) lives in Broadway.

    The Old Bakery: Brick construction, pre 1838. 1838 map reference: 202


    The Old Bakery, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'The Bakery' was occupied by Frederick and Florence Sherwood. He was a Master Baker.

    In 1949 'The Bakery' was occupied by Roy and Ruby Attwood.

    Ian Attwood the son of Roy now (2016) lives here with his wife Linda.

    The Old Exchange: This was the telephone exchange but is now (2015) the village post office. 1838 map reference: 89


    The Old Exchange, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.
    The Old Police House: A twentieth century house in Station Road next to the Village Hall. 1838 map reference: 108


    The Old Police House, Station Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Built in the early 20th century as a Police house.

    Savage
    PC David (Dave) Savage, the village policeman, and his wife lived here with their three children. There is a story remembered of a fight that took place outside the Golden Cross between gypsies. PC Savage was savage on this occasion and laid out several of them with his truncheon - not a man to be messed with. Joë Stephens describes him as

    "A villainous-looking chap, burley, broken-nose, a proper policeman who terrified all who saw him, whether criminal or not! Fortunately my father Steve Cook was a special constable so whenever PC Savage knocked on the door, it wasn't to nick us! After him, came PC O'Brien whose son Michael was a playmate.

    Then a new police house was built opposite Greycoat, and PC Woodbine came to police the area. His daughter madeline was also a playmate. I can't remember the name of his son, I expect we knew him as 'The Pest'."

    PC Savage had issue:-
    1. Jean
    2. David
    3. Joyce, she was married in 1953 to Wilson Neil Wheeler and lives (2014) opposite The Old Police House. See under Langton House for the Wheeler family.

    In 1939 the 'Police House' was occupied by David and Nancy Savage.

    In 1949 the 'Police House' was occupied by David and Nancy Savage.

    The police station was then moved over the road to one of the houses built by the Wheeler family. PC O'Brian was the village policeman for some time. The last village copper was PC David (Dave) Woodbine, he was a tall thin man half Irish and half Welsh.

    John and Barbara Shailer then moved in. The house was at that time called 'Windrush', and only became 'The Old Police Station' at a later date. John and Barbara now (2016) live on Cress Hill.

    The Old Rectory: A large multi-period house, the oldest part is believed to date from 1740. 1838 map reference: 203


    The Old Rectory, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'The Rectory' was occupied by Rev Boultbee and his family.

    In 1949 'The Rectory' was occupied by Ernest and Phyllis Downey and Nellie Foster.

    The Old Shakespeare: Much altered 19th century pub. 1838 map reference: 182


    The Old Shakespeare, Shakespeare Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Please use this link for a history of The Shakespeare.

    In 1939 'The Shakespeare' was occupied by George Walker.

    In 1949 'Shakespeare Inn' was occupied by George Walker.

    The Old Store: See under Malthouse Cottages. 1838 map reference: 199
    The Orchard: A house probably dating from the 1930's, 1838 map reference: 190


    The Orchard, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    William Hurd Adams
    William Hurd Adams, Farmer of Hill View, Badsey, bought Firbank in 1902 along with 12 acres of land. In 1904 Mr Adams was carrying out major restorion work on Firbank. In 1906 Mr Adams rented Firbank to the Towers family. In the 1911 Census Mr Adams, his wife Lydia and his children Elsie May, William Edward & Frank were living in Harvington. It is assumed that he was living in 'The Orchard', which he must have built in the grounds Firbank sometime between 1902 and 1906. Mr Adams died in 1916 when both properties were put to action in two lots.

    Ernest William Bunting
    Ernest William Bunting, was born in Haslingden, Lancashire in 1876. In 1912 he was married in Dudley to Grace M Clayton. On 16th May 1916, Ernest William Bunting of Norton and Lenchwick, Gentleman bought The Orchard for £2325. A son was born to them, Robert M H, born in the Evesham area 1917. Ernest Bunting died in the Evesham area in 1943, aged 67 and Grace died in Cheltenham in 1967, aged 84. The is no indication at present that Mr Bunting ever actually lived at The Orchard or when he sold the property.

    Trechmann
    In 1939 'The Orchard' was occupied by Niel G and Marion A Trechmann and in 1949 'Pikelands' was occupied by Niel Trechmann and Agnes Weatherop. Why was it called Pikelands in 1949 is not known.

    According to the 1939 Census Niel, was born 9th Oct 1898 and Marion, was born 27th March 1867.

    As a farmer Niel Trechmann did not respond to the Agricultural Act's policy of compulsorily requiring farmers to produce food. After several warnings he was one of only about six in the country who were forcibly removed from their property.

    The Millard family took over a tenancy. Jerry Millard, who lives in number two Glebe Cottages, grew up in the house. He later married Ann Newman, the daughter of Les Newman, whose family used to live in numbers 1 & 3 Crooked Walls.

    Walter Allvey remembers an incident just after WW2, when a well was exposed in the courtyard. There was a discussion as to whether it should be covered over or filled in. Someone said that: "Any idiot could fill it in but it took someone of great skill to dig one", So the well was capped.

    The Parsonage: The site of the parsonage is not known. It is mentioned once in the Parish Registers during the 17th century. It may have been on or near the site of the present Recotry.

    History of the property so far gathered.


    The Retreat: A Victorian House. 1838 map reference: 202

    The Retreat, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The home of Mrs Elsie Prowlin, the sister of Janet Bromley née Hughes. The Sherwoods also lived here.

    In 1939 'The Retreat' was occupied by Cyril Prowlin and his family.

    In 1949 'The Retreat' was occupied by Cyril and Elsie Prowlin.

    The Steps: A terrace of three half-timbered dwellings next to the Bakery in Stratford Road. The Steps were bought by the Council in the 1930's and are still used as rented property. 1838 map reference: 201


    The Steps, Stratford Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    One of the dwellings was the home of the Andrews family during the early years of the twentieth century. See the page on Families for details of this family.

    In 1949 'The Steps, Lower Evesham Road' was occupied by James and Sarah Dolphin. In 1949 'The Steps, Norton Road' was occupied by John and Doris Jones and Frank and Maud George.

    The Wooden House: A timber-framed house attached to Woodbine Cottage. 1838 map reference: 48


    Whistlewinds, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Pronounced 'Udden' there appears to be no photograph or indication of how old this place was. It was situated at the top of Leys Road and was attached to Woodbine Cottage. It was demolished in 1972.

    In the 1920/30's it was occupied by an elderly man called Arthur Bradshaw. He was born in Atch Lench and was a farm labourer in 1911 and had been married for 13 years. His wife was Ann Elizabeth. His mother Emma was living with them born in Abbots Lench and aged 71. In the 1939 Census he was stated as being born on 6 April 1866. Arthur Bradshaw died 1951 aged 84. Arthur and Ann had issue:-

    1. Harry, born Harvington, aged 12 in 1911.
    2. Arthur, born Harvington, aged 10 in 1911.
    3. Agnes Ellen, born Harvington, aged 7 in 1911.

    Thornelow: Name changed to Draycott.
    Topaz: The right hand of a pair of cottages dated to around 1900. 1838 map reference: 108d


    Oak Tree and Topaz, Cress Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    One of the documents in the Deeds of Candle Cottage is a reference to the Skinner's owning Oak Tree Villas in 1908. Note the reference to Villas, this suggests that Topas was included.

    In the 1940's both cottages were owned by the Marsh of Black and White Garages of Harvington to house their coach drivers. Tenants Jean and Ron Williams lived in the house until 1969. It was empty for two years until Wendy and Ian Roberts (died 2003) bought the property in 1971. They lived there until 2003 when Wendy moved to Mickleton.

    In 1949 'Justine' was occupied by John and Evelyn Salter.

    The property was known for many years as Topaz, a name that has been dropped, previous to Topaz it was called Justine. The present (2014) owner Gordon Valender has lived in the house for over 30 years. Previous to him was the Dewhurst family and previous to them was Tony and Beryl Sinderberry.

    Twistlebeck: See number 9, Brickyard Cottages. 1838 map reference: 1
    Valley View: Three Victorian brick cottages No's 2 & 3 are dated to 1896 while No.1, was built a little later. They were owned by the Bromleys until the 1950's. 1838 map reference: 109


    Valley View, Cress Hill.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Reginald and Frances White lived in one of the three properties from at least 1918 until Frances's death in 1932. For more information see under Familes

    In 1939 Thomas and Rose Mayfield occupied either number 1 or 2.

    Numbered one, two and three, number one, being the furthest from the road. Lilly Bromley (see Mona Cottage) owned the Cottages until the 1950/60's when very were sold. The first two (numbers 2 & 3) were built first in 1896 and followed by number 1 in 1904. From the beginning up until the 1950's, they would have been tenanted. Until the 1950's there was a complicated situation regarding the gardens to the rear but they have now been regulated so that each garden joins to its particular property. The source for much of this information was Mike Harris of number 1 in 2014.

    Number 1:
    Built 1904: In 1949 it was occupied by Daniel and Winifred Haywood. In the 1950's it was tenanted by Mr Dan Haywood and his wife Winnie. In 1959 they bought the house just into the lane in Abbots Salford opposite 'The Vinyard'. Mike and Sheila Harris bought number 1 from Lilly Mansell in 1959. For further information on the Harris family see under 'The Old Shop'.

    Number 2:
    Built 1896: Fred Brazier was a tenant with his wife Doris. In 1949 it was occupied by Frederick, Doris and Frances Brazier. They left the property in 1959. In 1939 they lived in Hughes Lane. He was Forman at Georges (now owned by Hillers) on the Alcester Road. It is believed that beforehand he also lived for a time in No.1. The Grahams' bought the property in the 1960's, then followed the Robinsons' etc., then Stuart & Andrea Beech to around 2000 when Clive Allen bought it.


    Number 3:
    Built 1896: In 1949 it was occupied by Mary Harrison. Percy & Lizzy Lynes bought it sometime before 1959 from Lilly Mansell. Percy also worked at Georges. They lived in it until the 1980's.

    In 1949 'Crest Hill' was occupied by Percy and Elizabeth Lynes.

    Well Cottage: Well Cottage: now rare Victorian prefabricated bungalow set within its own grounds on the corner of Hughes Lane and Hughes Close. 1838 map reference: 220


    Well Cottage, Hughes Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    The original bungalow was built in 1873 and as its name implies, boasts a well. The property was originally simply called 'The Bungalow'. When it was decided to move the pump, until recently in the back garden, a well was discovered beneath it. Walter then built the present well head and awning and they renamed the property 'Well Cottage'.

    In 1939 'The Bungalow' was occupied by William and Lily Evans-Harris.

    In 1949 'The Bungalow, Hughes Lane' was occupied by Frederick and Jane Marshall.

    Mr Marshall lived there until 1964, he was a train driver.

    In February 1964, Walter (Wally) Allvey and his wife Muriel bought the property and lived in it until 2015, during which time the bungalow has been extended and improved. Much of the present layout of the garden was created by Muriel. Wally has now (2015) sold his house and is living in a sheltered home in Evesham.

    Walter Ernest Allvey was born in London and moved down here during the last War. He married Muriel in 1940. They lived in a number of houses in Harvington, the first being one of the cottages in Shakespeare Lane; the middle cottage in what is now Dream Cottage; and for a number of years during the early 1960's in a flat in Salford Hall. In February 1964 they moved into Well Cottage in Hughes Lane, where they have lived ever since. They have one son called Leon.

    Walter Alfred Allvey, the father of Walter moved from Hornchurch in Essex to Harvington after the death of his second wife and for a while ran a barbers shop in the small building attached to the barn alongside Pool Cottage.

    Taylor Family:
    Muriel Eunice Taylor, was born in Ye Olde Cottage in Harvington. Muriel worked for the Hodgkinson's in Dalkeith when she was a teenager. Her grandparents were George and Mary Jane.

    George Taylor, born in Inkberrow, Worcs. He married at Bishampton 1892 to Mary Jane Watkins, of that village. In the 1911 Census he was aged 54 while she was born in Bishampton, aged 50. From the births of their children it appears that they probably lived in Inkberrow and Rous Lench before settling in Harvington, George was an itinerant Shepherd. For a time he lived in the Cotswolds, near to Stow-on-the-Wold. Walter told the story that they loaned a wagon in Harvington to take their possessions to Broadway where the new employee's wagon was waiting for them. In Harvington they lived for a while in Crooked Walls, Thatchways, Candle Cottage and Ye Old Cottage. Later in life, after George had died, Mary Jane lived in one of the Coles Cottages before they were demolished and then for a while in The Steps. They had issue:

    1. George Edward, born Bishampton 1893. He died in the Great War and a biography of him is to be found in the page on Harvington's War Dead.
    2. Ernest, possibly born Inkberrow and aged 16 in 1901.
    3. Beatrice, born Bishampton and aged 16 in 1911. Lived in No. 3, Shakespeare Cottages.
    4. Charles, born Rous Lench and aged 13 in 1911. Charles lived in Bank Cottage.
    5. Herbert, born Harvington and aged 6 in 1911.
    6. Gertrude E, born Harvington and aged 4 in 1911. She married Allen Hawker in 1931.

    There was a nephew and niece of Muriel Taylor called Robert Taylor and his sister Patricia Taylor. During the WW2 they were sent down to Harvington from Coventry. Robert lived with his auntie Beat in Shakespeare Cottages and Patricia lived with uncle Charles in Bank Cottage.

    Memorials to the family are in the new churchyard.

    West Holme: Victorian house. 1838 map reference: 84


    West Holme, Alcester Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Westholm' was occupied by William and Jane Chatterley. William was a schoolteacher at Harvington School.

    In 1949 'Westholme' was occupied by David Ramsey, Christina Ramsey, Jessie Oliver and Elizabeth Fairweath.

    Whistlewinds: Greatly enlarged if not new property once called Woodbine Cottage and The Wooden House. 1838 map reference: 48


    Whistlewinds, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Whistlewinds, built in 1972, is the new name for what is virtually a new house. All that remains of Woodbine Cottage is one remaining Blue Lias stone wall behind the conservatory. Woodbine Cottage was of brick and stone construction while The Wooden House was timber framed. Unfortunately there is no known photograph of either Woodbine Cottage or the attached The Wooden House. They were once part of the Bomford Estate.

    Reynolds Family
    Thomas (Tom) Reynolds, 17 Jan 1884, lived in Woodbine Cottage in the 1920/30's. he married Rose F, born 25 Jan 1892. They had issue:-

    1. Violet M, born Alcester 24 Dec 1819. In service for the Hughes at Danvic in 1939. She later married a Seeney.
    2. Harry, born Harvington 1929, now living in Ragley Road.

    In 1939 Thomas and Rose Reynolds were still living in Woodbine Cottage.

    In 1949 'Woodbine Cottage' was occupied by Joseph and Jenny Jones, Ambrose Williams, Tom and Rose Reynolds Probably in both Woodbine and Wooden House).

    In the late 1980's Caitlin, her sister Emma? Jones lived here with their parents. They left in the 1990's.

    Whyte Croft: A detached house dated to the mid-20th century. 1838 map reference: 7


    Whyte Croft, Leys Road.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    Windrush, Station Road: Name changed to The Old Police Station. 1838 map reference: 107
    Woodbine Cottage: Name changed to Whistlewinds. 1838 map reference: 48
    Yew Tree Cottage: A box-framed cottage thought to date from the 1540's. 1838 map reference: 211


    Yew Tree Cottage, Grange Lane.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    In 1939 'Yew Tree Cottage' was occupied by Alice and Gertrude McGee.

    In 1949 'Yew Tree Cottage' was occupied by Alice and Grace McGee.

    The cottage has a most interesting and ancient window protruding from the roof. The roof was originally of thatch but a severe fire, evidenced by the charred roof timbers, had destroyed part of the roof (information from Gerry, the present owner). It was at this time that the thatch was replaced by tiles. There is an ancient yew in the front garden possibly dating to the fourteenth century. There is also a fine well in the back garden with its wellhead intact.

    This was the home of the Hancock family of which PC Redbeard was one. He was the village policeman.

    Ye Olde Cottage: Once called 'Shepherds Cottage', a cruck-framed thatched cottage, probably dating from the 16th century. 1838 map reference: 226


    Ye Olde Cottage, Village Street.

    History of the property so far gathered.

    This was the birth place of Muriel Taylor, the wife of Walter Allvey, who now (2013) lives at Well Cottage. Muriel's grandfather was a shepherd and lived in various houses in Harvington.

    TIn 1939 'The Old Cottage' was occupied by Henry Chamberlain.

    In 1949 'Old Cottage' was empty.

    The cottage is now the home of Cyril and Ann Westcott. Ann was a Barr by birth and was born at Firbank.