ASPECTS OF HARVINGTON'S HISTORY
A personal rendering

Coach & Horses
  Home      pre 1066      Buildings      Census Returns      Church      Dovecote      Facebook      Families      Histories      Houses      Maps       Notes & Queries       Parish Council      People      Pictures      Public Houses       School       Sports      Transport      War Time      WI      Contact:   

HARVINGTON NOTES AND QUERIES

There is no order to the following assortment of stories, snippets or memorabilia that has been gathered together and published here, the only connecting factor is the Village. This is a new page so at present there is very little, however it is hoped that in time it it will grow.

Please feel free to use this facility by sending an email with your note or query to the Editor.


March 2018
OLD BARN NEAR LONGLANDS:

The two maps above shew the area in 1838 and 2015. The ditches and field boundaries have changed somewhat but one can, if intermediate maps are studied, see that an L-shaped barn, or its predicessor, existed in 1838. The southern 'W' (for well) indicates the position of our site, below is a more detailed sketch.

The land here is low lying and truncated by large drainage ditches. The piece of land on which the barn stood is in a corner of land with ditches on two sides and a track on the third. One of the ditches is seen to curve around the site which suggests that the site is older than the ditch. All that now remains are a few visible Blue Lias footings indicating where the barn once stood, a well and two mature trees, a walnut and an oak.

John Shailer remembers the barn as old and delapitated. It had two double doors big enough to take a tractor, and was used as storage by the market gardners who worked the surrounding land. There were internal divisions and it sometimes doubled up as sleeping quarters for itinerant workers. Does anyone have a photograph of it.


January 2018
TOLLHOUSE OF HARVINGTON:

In the upper left hand corner of this photograph dated 1905 is the word Tollhouse with an arrow pointing to a small thatched building. The building is certainly positioned correctly and has the appearance of a tollhouse. Its position however is in the centre of the village which is strange. Does anyone know of another reference to this building?


August 2016
BANKS OF HARVINGTON: reminiscent of sunken lanes.

It has been noted that the word bank appears in a number of house names and lanes in the older part of Harvington. In all cases a sunken lane or rise of ground is present. Old Harvington was a village of slopes and sunken lanes and many were far more pronounced than they are today. The surface of the streets or roads, or lanes as they once were, have been raised, in the case of Church Street by as much as three feet in places.

  • Bank Cottage sits on a bank directly upon the edge of the Stratford Road.
  • Bank House sits high up and back from the sunken lane of Stratford Road.
  • Church Bank is an old name for Church Street at a time when it was far more pronounced.
  • Ivy Bank on Station Bank is named not because of the lane but because it sits under a cliff that separates it from Cress Hill.
  • Station Bank is the name for the upper part of Anchor Lane as it cuts deeply into the natural lie of the land and is a classic sunken lane.
  • Village street has a less obvious depression which was probably more pronounced than it is now both in the raising of the road surface and the reduction of the banks either side.

The banks in Harvington have helped to create a style of house construction in that the older timber-framed buildings tend to be set upon Blue Lias stone platforms faced on the roadside by revetment walls. The layout is reminiscent of the house platforms to be seen in deserted medieval settlements.


October 2015
PROPERTY DEEDS: Does anyone have access to an old property deed from Harvington, if so then would they mind them being copied. During the last forty years or so the great majority of properties across the County have been registered. This Registration takes place when a property changes hands. Once the process has been carried out the deed ceases to be an official document and is normally returned to the mortgagee or owner. From this stage onwards deeds are at risk of being destroyed. If the property is deemed of historical value then County record offices may shew an interest. Every time a property changes hands transaction documents are added, thereby giving a potted history of the property. Due to the complexities of property ownership, deeds often include neighbouring land. Documents dating from the nineteenth century and earlier, especially large scale title deeds, often on parchment, can be attractive works of art, albeit difficult to read and understand. Clients were charged by the word and solicitors could easily string out the meaning by use of excessive duplication. Some of the material contained in deeds can be of great interest to the local historian, see the deeds of Cotswold View as an example, both in who owned what and where in the Village.


December 2015
WAITING FOR A 'DIP' AT THE HARVINGTON FETE: who were they?


December 2015
THREE MEN AND THREE CART HORSES: Geoffrey Shailer is in the centre, who are the other two.


December 2015
HARVEST TIME: Can anyone add more names? Jack Tyack is believed to be third from the left.


December 2015
FOOTBALL TEAM: Can anyone add more names? Top back left: William (Bill) Shailer. Front, second and third from left is Cresswell and J. Cresswell.


December 2015
SCHOOL OUTING: Can anyone add more names? Geoff Shailer, back far left; Reg Coley, centre.


December 2015
RECTORY MEETING: This is probably at the Rectory, date unknown. Can anyone add names?.


December 2015
HARVINGTON INFANT SCHOOL: a school photograph dating from the 1920's. Can anyone add names? Named from the left.

Back two:-

  1. ?
  2. ?
Back row:
  1. Dorothy Prudden (Teacher).
  2. ?
  3. ?
  4. ?
  5. ?
  6. ?
  7. ?
  8. ?
  9. ?
  10. ?
Front row:
  1. ?
  2. ?
  3. ?
  4. ?
  5. ?
  6. ?
  7. ?
  8. ?


August 2017
HARVINGTON INFANT SCHOOL: a school photograph dating from circa 1928. Can anyone add names? Named from the left.

Back row:-

  1. ?
  2. ?
  3. ?
  4. ?
  5. ?
  6. Herbert best
  7. ?
Middle row:
  1. ?
  2. ?
  3. ?
  4. ?
  5. Rosa Best
  6. ?
  7. ?
  8. ?
Front row:
  1. ?
  2. ?
  3. ?
  4. ?
  5. ?
  6. ?
  7. ?
  8. ?


December 2015
A LADIES OUTING: a photograph of a group of women on an outing possibly dating from the 1920's. Can anyone help to identify.


December 2015
A GATHERING: a fine photograph of a group of men possibly dating from the 1920's. Does anybody know the others? Named from the left.

Back row:-

  1. ?.
  2. ?.
  3. Jack Tyack?
  4. ?
  5. ?
  6. ?
Front row:
  1. ?
  2. Reg Coley
  3. ?


December 2015
TWO SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHS: taken at Harvington School in the late 1940's. They are named from the left.

Back row:-

  1. Mike Harris.
  2. John Shailer.
  3. Roger Ludlow.
  4. Eric Blake.
  5. Clifford Bishop.
  6. Reg Bromley.
  7. Brian Withers.
  8. Gerald Hiorns.
Middle Row:-

  1. Susan Ashmead.
  2. Angela Rawlings.
  3. Ann Lockey.
  4. Christie Cresswell (Teacher).
  5. Barbara Ward.
  6. Ena Williams.
  7. Ann Newman (Millard).

Front row:-

  1. Martin Lockey.
  2. David Savage.
  3. Barbara Taylor.
  4. John Bishop.
  5. David Bishop.

Back row:-

  1. John Shailer.
  2. Roger Ludlow.
  3. Eric Blake.
  4. Clifford Bishop.
  5. Reg Bromley.
  6. Brian Withers.
  7. Gerald Hiorns.
Middle Row:-

  1. Susan Ashmead.
  2. Angela Rawlings.
  3. Ann Lockey.
  4. Barbara Taylor (Plumb).
  5. Barbara Ward.
  6. Ena Williams.
  7. Ann Newman (Millard)

Front row:-

  1. Martin Lockey.
  2. David Savage.
  3. Mike Harris.
  4. John Bishop.
  5. David Bishop.


October 2015
WOMENS INSTITUTE MEETING: This photograph was donated by Angela Raby. It was taken in the Village Hall, probably in the late 1950's. Identifying people so long after is not easy but we are making progress. The people on the photo have been numbered and below is a list of those identified so far. Can anyone add names to the few faces left unidentified?


  1. Mrs Bywater - lived in Ferndale, Leys Road.
  2. Nan Walker, neé Ballard, Leys Road, Mrs Jimm's sister.
  3. Ethel, wife of Frank Harris, Horseshoe Cottage.
  4. Mrs Brotherage, Lawrence's mother.
  5. Mrs George, Station Bank.
  6. Phyllis, Rev Ernest H Downey's wife.
  7. Doris, Reg Coley's wife.
  8. Hilary Tyack, lived at The Orchard, Village Street.
  9. Mrs Simmons, Fred's mum.
  10. Iris White, married a Bundy, Leys Road.
  11. Violet, wife of Frank Cresswell, lived in Blakenhurst.
  12. Mrs Lizzie Hughes, Joe's mum, lived in Village Street.
  13. Mrs Meredyth, of Leys Road.
  14. Daisy Harris, of Salford Priors.
  15. May Holder.
  16. Edith Harris, wife if Vic Harris, mother of Graham.
  17. Mrs Ivy Cowley, lived in 47 Village Street, died in Brompton House, Broadway.
  18. Marianne Taylor, lived in Firbank.
  19. Mrs Ludlow, lived up Grange Lane.
  20. Miss Dipper, she was a housekeeper to Edgar Cresswell and lived on the Evesham Road.
  21. Joan Cresswell, sister of Ken (Bangit)
  22. Elsie Stephens, lived in 1 Leys Road, her son was a policeman in Warwick.
  23. Mrs Mason, Pam Walden's grandmother.
  24. Mrs Walker, of Leys Road.
  25. Pip Stone, of Dalkeith.
  26. Mrs Flora Brewer, of Leys Road.
  27. Miss Lillian Morrow, She looked after Freddie Bomford in his old age at the Grange. She was the niece of his wife Annette.
  28. Gertrude Guckel, an Austrian girl who married in 1948 Rex W J Ashley.
  29. Bessie Shailer.
  30. Mrs Cadwallader, Gran Gladys.
  31. Bessie Shailer, mother of Connie Rawlings.
  32. Mrs Taylor.
  33. Christie Beasley, she married Ray Cresswell and lived in Station Road.
  34. Winnie, wife of Dan Haywood, lived on Cress Hill. Winifred Elsmore married Daniel Haywood in 1937.


October 2015


A new bridge, placed here in early 2018.

MONKEY ISLAND: There is no monkey and no island, however from at least the 1940's the area around the footbridge across Harvington Brook has been known by the village children as Monkey Island. The footpath to the bridge originates from the path running past Bank House and and the one from the present Finch Lane. References are from the Davies children of Crooked Walls in the 1980's and Mike Harris who remembers the name as a child in the 1940's. The area was surrounded by orchards and it is possible that this copse of larger trees was treated by the village children as their own 'secret' island.